UK companies gave £420m to charities, says new edition of DSC company giving guide

first_img  153 total views,  1 views today UK companies gave over £420 million to charities last year, according to the 11th edition of The Guide to UK Company Giving. Published next week, the book details over 400 companies that donate to and support communities and voluntary organisations.The guide is, as its title suggests, more than a simple directory listing. For example, it differentiates between types of giving and provides an extensive profile of individual company practices, with the intention of helping fundraisers target relevant companies.Ethical profileThe guide also details ethical information about corporate supporters and advises on how to identify which corporations are most likely to support certain causes.The Guide to UK Company Giving is designed to be used by large and small organisations, whether or not they have a dedicated corporate fundraising team.The guide also has a section on corporate charities which includes details on those grant-makers associated with a company, in turn giving around £321 million. The Guide to UK Company Giving 2016/17 also includes analysis and advice on:• Corporate social responsibility (CSR)            • Giving in the UK and whether in cash or in-kind• How to apply• Partnerships   • Matched funding• Commercially led support     • Charity of the Year    • Pro bono work• Recipients of previous funding• Ratio of women to men on the board of directors   New sections in this edition cover:• Acknowledgement of Anti-Slavery legislation• Giving to small charities• Giving to unpopular causes• Status as a Living Wage Employer AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis22 Tagged with: corporate Directory of Social Change Funding Advertisement About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.center_img UK companies gave £420m to charities, says new edition of DSC company giving guide  Advice and context   154 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis22 The Guide to UK Company Giving is available for £85 from DSC. Howard Lake | 30 April 2017 | Newslast_img read more

New homes in Hackney

first_imgWorking with Hackney Council on the regeneration of the Colville Estate, residential developer Anthology is delivering 198 new homes in Hoxton, London.The first phase of the 11.98 acre Colville Estate regeneration project has been taking place over the last five years and now, extending to approximately 0.93 acres, this particular phase of the ongoing regeneration will consist of a 16 and a 20 storey tower.The site of Hoxton Press was once home to a paper manufacturing company owned by the Mullord Brothers who produced paper products including lace paper greeting cards and playing cards from the 1860s to early 1900s. In keeping with this history Anthology has named the towers ‘Mono’ and ‘Duo’, printmaking techniques.The first release of homes at Hoxton Press will be in the ‘Duo’ block offering studios, one and two bedroom apartments and penthouses. Guide prices from £500,000.David Newey, Project Director for Anthology Hoxton Press said, “Our Hoxton Press development will sit comfortably in the heart of Hackney, with all local travel connections just a stone’s throw away. The community has its own identity, with markets, shops and design studios – these are just some of the unique attributes that have really enabled Hoxton to become such a desirable location.”Hackney housing development new homes in Hackney Colville Estate regeneration November 30, 2016The NegotiatorWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Home » News » Land & New Homes » New homes in Hackney previous nextLand & New HomesNew homes in HackneyThe Negotiator30th November 20160788 Viewslast_img read more

Capacities and operations of nautical tourism ports in 2019

first_imgAs the entire tourism sector is directly affected by the Covid-19 pandemic, nautical tourism is in the same situation, where the pre-season is just opening and closing for boaters. Concrete figures show that Croatia is a nautical superpower. Croatia thus has a fleet of 4.300 vessels, more than 140 nautical tourism ports with over 17.000 berths and over a million cruise passengers. The average consumption of nautical tourists is 126 euros per day, and in the charter 183 euros per day. More than 30 percent of that money is spent on other forms of tourism, from cultural to wine and gastronomic offerings. Observed by Adriatic counties, the largest revenue in nautical tourism ports in 2019 was generated by the Šibenik-Knin County, namely HRK 233 million, which is 25,4% of the total revenue generated by nautical tourism ports. Source: CBS Compared to 2018, the revenue of nautical tourism ports increased by 3,5% in Šibenik-Knin County. With revenues of HRK 207 million, they are followed by nautical tourism ports in the Split-Dalmatia County, which compared to 2018 achieved an increase in revenues by 4,6%. Increase in the number of vessels on a permanent berth by 4,6% compared to 2018. Most vessels on a permanent berth were under the flag of Croatia, 44,1%. They are followed by vessels under the flag of Austria (15,6%), Germany (15,5%), Slovenia (5,0%) and Italy (3,8%). According to the type of vessel in transit for which a berth at sea was used, most were sailing yachts (64,9%), followed by motor yachts (29,1%) and other vessels (6,0%). The total revenue of nautical tourism ports in 2019 amounted to HRK 918 million. Of that, HRK 652 million was generated from the rental of berths, which is 71,0% of the total revenue generated. Compared to 2018, total revenue increased by 7,2% and berth rental revenue by 5,4%. In 2019, there were 204 vessels in transit in nautical tourism ports, which is an increase in the number of vessels by 858% compared to 5,5. Boaters also proposed the necessary measures to save nautical tourism in Croatia, the most important of which are the exemption of marinas from paying a fixed and variable part of the concession fee for maritime property, inclusion of marinas in the tourism sector, and nautical tourism, which is logical, also wants to be part of the project Cro cards. This research covered 167 nautical tourism ports on the Croatian coast, namely 78 marinas (of which 17 dry marinas), 75 anchorages, 9 moorings and 5 berths for vessels. The total area of ​​their waters is 4 m349 with 270 berths. Increase in the number of vessels in transit by 5,5% compared to 2018. According to the length of the vessel, most vessels for which a berth at sea was used is 12 to 15 meters long (ie 32,0% of the total number of vessels for which a berth was used at sea), followed by vessels 10 to 12 meters long (ie 29,1 , XNUMX% of the total number of vessels for which a berth at sea was used). Photo: Pixabay.com Last year was also a record year in nautical tourism, in which the revenue of nautical tourism ports increased by 7,2% compared to 2018. The research of the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS) on the capacities and operations of nautical ports brings us a more detailed state of nautical tourism. tourism in 2019 In Šibenik-Knin County, most vessels have a permanent berth at sea Split-Dalmatia County is the first in the number of vessels in transit for which a berth at sea was used In 2019, most vessels in transit for which a berth at sea was used were in the Split-Dalmatia County, namely 55 vessels, which is 343% of the total number of vessels in transit for which a berth at sea was used. Compared to 27,3, there was a slight increase in the number of vessels in transit by 2018% in the Split-Dalmatia County. In the ports of nautical tourism on 31 December 2019, there were 14 vessels on a permanent berth, which is 249% more than on 4,6 December 31. 2018% of vessels used berths at sea, and only 84,9 on the mainland. 15,1% of the vessel. Nautical tourism ports in Šibenik-Knin County generated the highest revenues in 2019. In 2019, most vessels in transit were from Croatia (47,8%), Italy (14,1%), Germany (12,2%), Austria (7,0%) and Slovenia (4,1%), which makes up 85,2% of the total number of vessels in transit. In 2019, Šibenik-Knin County had the most vessels on a permanent berth at sea, namely 2 vessels, which is 898% of the total number of vessels on a permanent berth at sea. Compared to 24,0, the number of vessels at permanent berth at sea increased by 2018% in Šibenik-Knin County. Source: CBS Capacities and operations of nautical tourism ports in 2019 In 2019, the revenue of nautical tourism ports increased by 7,2% compared to 2018. According to the type of vessels on a permanent berth in the sea, most were yachts (49,0%), followed by motor yachts (46,4%) and other vessels (4,6%).last_img read more

My work as a prostitute led me to oppose decriminalisation

first_imgBBC News 2 October 2017Family First Comment: A fascinating read – warning the world of NZ’s flawed experiment….“For most of her life in prostitution in New Zealand, Sabrinna Valisce campaigned for decriminalisation of the sex trade. But when it actually happened she changed her mind and now argues that men who use prostitutes should be prosecuted.In 1989, after two years working on the streets, Valisce visited the New Zealand Prostitutes Collective (NZPC) in Christchurch. “I was looking for some support, perhaps to exit prostitution, but all I was offered was condoms,” she says. “They started talking about how stigma against ‘sex workers’ was the worst thing about it, and that prostitution is just a job like any other,” Valisce remembers. “It somehow made what she was doing seem more palatable.” Valisce says that in New Zealand it was a disaster, and only benefited the pimps and punters.”In 1989, after two years working on the streets, Valisce visited the New Zealand Prostitutes Collective (NZPC) in Christchurch.“I was looking for some support, perhaps to exit prostitution, but all I was offered was condoms,” she says.She was also invited to the collective’s regular wine and cheese social on Friday nights.“They started talking about how stigma against ‘sex workers’ was the worst thing about it, and that prostitution is just a job like any other,” Valisce remembers.It somehow made what she was doing seem more palatable.She became the collective’s massage parlour co-ordinator and an enthusiastic supporter of its campaign for the full decriminalisation of all aspects of the sex trade, including pimps.“It felt like there was a revolution coming. I was so excited about how decriminalisation would make things better for the women,” she says.Decriminalisation arrived in 2003, and Valisce attended the celebration party held by the prostitutes’ collective.But she soon became disillusioned.The Prostitution Reform Act allowed brothels to operate as legitimate businesses, a model often hailed as the safest option for women in the sex trade.In the UK, the Home Affairs Select Committee has been considering a number of different approaches towards the sex trade, including full decriminalisation. But Valisce says that in New Zealand it was a disaster, and only benefited the pimps and punters.“I thought it would give more power and rights to the women,” she says. “But I soon realised the opposite was true.”One problem was that it allowed brothel owners to offer punters an “all-inclusive” deal, whereby they would pay a set amount to do anything they wanted with a woman.“One thing we were promised would not happen was the ‘all-inclusive’,” says Valisce. “Because that would mean the women wouldn’t be able to set the price or determine which sexual services they offered or refused – which was the mainstay of decriminalisation and its supposed benefits.”Aged 40, Valisce approached a brothel in Wellington for a job, and was shocked by what she saw.“During my first shift, I saw a girl come back from an escort job who was having a panic attack, shaking and crying, and unable to speak. The receptionist was yelling at her, telling her to get back to work. I grabbed my belongings and left,” she says.Shortly afterwards, she told the prostitutes’ collective in Wellington what she had witnessed. “What are we doing about this?” she asked. “Are we working on any services to help get out?”She was “absolutely ignored”, she says, and finally left the prostitutes’ collective.Until then, the organisation had been her only source of support, a place to go where no-one judged her for working in the sex trade.It was while volunteering there, though, that she had begun her journey towards becoming an “abolitionist”.“One of my jobs at NZPC was to find all of the media clippings. There was one thing I read: it was somebody talking about being in tears and not knowing why, and it wasn’t until they were out [of the sex trade] that they understood what those feelings were.“I had been through that for years [thinking], ‘I don’t know what’s going on, why am I feeling like this?’ and realised when I read that: ‘Oh God, that’s me.’”For Valisce, there was no turning back.She left prostitution in early 2011 and moved to the Gold Coast in Queensland, Australia, seeking a new direction in life, but was confused and depressed. When her neighbour tried to recruit her into webcam prostitution, she politely declined. “I felt like I had ‘whore’ stamped on my forehead. How did she know to ask me? I now know being female was the only reason”, says Valisce. Afterwards the neighbour hurled insults at Valisce whenever she saw her.Valisce began to meet women online, feminists who were against decriminalisation and described themselves as abolitionists – the abolitionist model, also currently being considered by the UK’s Home Affairs Select Committee, criminalises the pimps and punters while decriminalising the prostituted person.Valisce set up a group called Australian Radical Feminists and was soon invited to a conference. Held at the University of Melbourne last year, it was the first abolitionist event ever to be held in Australia, where many states have legalised the brothel trade.READ MORE: http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-41349301Keep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

Dominican Martial Artist is World Martial Artist of the Year

first_img Share Dominican martial arts instructor, Shannah Robin has been appointed World Martial Artist of the year.Robin currently holds a 7th degree black belt, the highest level attained by any Dominican.He is also the first Dominican to create his own martial arts style, and the youngest Dominican to receive the services medal of honor award for his outstanding contributions to his country in working with youth through martial arts.He informed Dominica Vibes that he is honored to be inducted in the biggest martial arts hall of fame located in Atlantic City.“To be in the presence of all the legends, ones that I dreamt of all my life. To see all these big guys on the screen and now being in their presence, shaking their hands and taking pictures to the point where I was the pad holder for Michael Jai White in his seminar, I mean that’s beyond words.“That is an opportunity many people wish they could have and fortunately for me I had that opportunity on Saturday. There was over 2,000 people there… It was an amazing experience, putting Dominica on the map,” he remarked.Michael Jai White is an American actor, director, and martial artist.Meanwhile, Robin says that he looks forward to sharing his experience with Dominican students.“My next move is to try bringing Michael Jai White to Dominica. I spoke to him about it, we’re going to exchange some information and once we get the government onboard and the Ministry of Tourism on board to help and and get some sponsors, I could get him down here, take him to some schools, so the children can see and feel and be motivated and inspired by a man who comes from a humble beginning and make it to the top.”Robin says that he is currently building universal martial arts internationally by providing quality training for the youth of Dominica and abroad alike.Shihan Shannah Robin poses with Michael Jai White 100 Views   no discussions Tweet Share Sharing is caring! Shihan Shannah Robin receiving his award LifestyleLocalNews Dominican Martial Artist is World Martial Artist of the Year by: – January 28, 2020 Sharelast_img read more