Shape up for Sevens Rugby

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS “They do speed work at home, according to where we are in our training cycle. The aim is to move from a speed/endurance base towards shorter, faster sprint sessions. On the track, they might do eight 60m sprints at maximum intensity, or a rolling 5m followed by a 40m sprint.“Prehab exercises help strengthen bad ankles or shoulders, alleviate lower-back issues and correct muscle imbalances. We also included more contact sessions this year.“The guys work hard off the pitch too, on video analysis and psychology. In sevens you don’t have 80 minutes to make amends for mistakes, so they need to be mentally prepared for making game-deciding decisions under pressure.”This article appeared in the December 2011 issue of Rugby World Magazine.Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK. Or you may prefer the digital edition on your MAC, PC, or iPad. Would you like to sign up to Rugby World’s excellent weekly email newsletter? Click here.For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170center_img Isoa Damudamu of the England Sevens team in action during sprint trainingThe new-look HSBC Sevens World Series kicks off in Australia on 25-26 November. Sevens players are placed under intense physical stress over the two days, and preparation is the key to success, as England’s strength and conditioning expert Brett Davison explains…“The England Sevens squad had a five-week break to recover from last season, during which they had a total break from weights and could eat or drink what they liked.“The guys tend to come back a bit overweight and under-conditioned. Pre-season is the time to get them back into shape. They have to be able to recover completely, and live normal lives before getting back into a tough 11-month cycle.“Pre-season consists of six weeks of hard graft, a week off, and a warm-up tournament before the trip to Australia, but the first thing all players took part in was a profiling day.“We discuss previous injuries and identify any potential weaknesses and muscle imbalances. It involves podiatry, doing medical questionnaires, functional movements and core control exercises.“Early training involves low-intensity skills work, with the mileage and load increasing each week, controlled by GPS.“The boys work in pairs or positions in the gym. We do circuit-based sessions, weights to protect their joints in contact, and plyometric work to help build explosive power.last_img read more

Scotland beat Fiji to continue unbeaten run

first_imgScrum-half Nikola Matawulu was the pick of the Fijians and at the heart of every good move and it was Matawalu who set Talebula free for a long-range try that the Scotland defence were powerless to stop. That set Scottish nerves jangling as it brought the score to 25-27. Luckily for Scotland, he was inexplicably substituted just afterwards and Visser was able to increase the lead again with a well-taken try.Willing to run from anywhere until the end, perhaps over-enthusiasm resulted in scruffy passes when patience from Fiji could easily have paid dividends against a Scotland team tiring in the 30-degree heat.Danger: Nikola Matawalu asks questions of the Scots defenceAs it was Scotland held out with strong defence from De Luca and Scott combining well in midfield to create turnover chances.Scotland suffered from a lack of ball in the second half but refreshingly they were clinical when they did get chances, scoring three tries (two for Visser on a confidence-building debut) and Laidlaw finding goal-kicking conditions easy.After the match both squads created a giant circular huddle to give thanks – the result may not have been to the liking of the Fijian crowd, but it seems the people and the team were delighted at Scotland playing a full Test in their country.With the midweek match planned for Australia cancelled there are many on tour who have only had cameos, namely Duncan Weir, Tom Ryder, Richie Vernon and Tom Brown and a few yet to feature at all, in Rob Harley and Alex Grove.Scotland will want to keep their unbeaten record intact – their second under Robinson – but they will play a Samoan unit with more structure than Fiji, and no less passion. It will be a big undertaking for Robinson to make it 3-0 and Robinson will have to weigh that temptation against giving more game-time to the likes of Weir, whose strong kicking game may actually suit the Samoa test. Fiji’s half back Nikola Matawalu (C) is tackled by Scotland’s players during their rugby union match in Lautoka on June 16, 2012. Scotland won the match 37-25. AFP PHOTO / Bruce SOUTHWICK (Photo credit should read BRUCE SOUTHWICK/AFP/GettyImages) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS On the front foot: Max Evans (pictured) and Scotland continued their unbeaten summer tour with a win over Fiji Fiji 25-37 ScotlandBy Rory BaldwinFOR A Scotland team brimming with confidence after defeating Australia in Newcastle, the second test in Fiji represented a good chance for them to build on that and cement an unbeaten tour record. It also represented a potentially damaging pothole after Scotland’s last visit in 1998 had seen the hosts blast their way to a 51-26 win.Contrasted with the cold and damp conditions at home, in Churchill Park, Laukota, it was dry, hot and sunny. In fact ideal conditions for rugby, and a sea change from the deluge of Newcastle.Scotland came intent on controlling the pace and territory of the game with set-piece play, and trying to avoid helter-skelter sevens style rugby; at least that was the theory, yet Fiji opened the scoring and after a couple of penalties and it looked like the good ship  Scotland was taking on water.They didn’t exactly aid their cause by playing headless rugby in the opening quarter, with even Richie Gray throwing needless offloads that ended up in the hands of the hosts.In full flight: Richie Gray gives Scotland momentumScotland looked for too much space around corners when directness was called for, but with Fiji, predictably, hitting hard and happy to contest at the breakdown it was easy to understand their desire to avoid contact.Laidlaw’s try settled Scotland’s nerves. The score itself was typical of him, scrabbling over from short range at a ruck and Edinburgh team mate and Fiji captain Netani Talei would have been a bit annoyed he didn’t see it coming.That score served to re-adjust back to what we had expected: Laidlaw ran the game while the excellent Rennie and Gray got Scotland moving forward, and Fijian indiscipline gave Scotland points, including a penalty try.center_img TAGS: Fiji With Australia clearly focused on a three-Test series against Wales, Samoa looked at the start of the tour like it could potentially be the sternest test of Scotland, and it still does.Follow Scottish Rugby blog on twitter @scotrugbybloglast_img read more

Medical chief calls for rules change to protect rugby players from head injuries

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS BBC Panorama programme, presented by former Scotland international John Beattie, looks at the rise of head injuries in rugby Guido Petti collides with Dan Carter’s shin as he scores against the All BlacksAmerican brain scientist Prof Ann McKee has been analysing the brains of former athletes who played contact sport, linking head knocks to a type of dementia called Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.“There is an absolute link between head trauma, multiple minor head traumas and a neurodegeneration, and the one we’re seeing most commonly is something called CTE,” she told the BBC.“The lesson to world sport is I think we should stop arguing about whether or not playing sports with a lot of hits to the head is a risk for this disorder. It is.” Eye-tracking technology that could help detect head injuries is to be trialled (Getty Images) center_img A recent report concluded that of the 91 former American Football players who donated their brains for study, 87 showed signs of CTE.Panorama broadcasts tonight (Sep 21) on BBC One at 20.30. With head injuries and concussions on the rise, World Rugby’s chief medical officer, Martin Raftery, says rules need to change to reduce concussions.In a BBC Panorama programme, to be broadcast tonight (Sep 21), Raftery says tackling needs to be looked into to make the sport safer, with reported concussions up over 50 per cent in England in the last five years.According to the BBC, Raftery will be reviewing video footage of 900 concussions to identify how brain injuries occur, with potential rule changes coming as a result of his analysis.“Player welfare is about identifying what the risk is and then bringing about change,” he said. “There’s no doubt that the biggest area that we know where concussion is going to occur is in the tackle, so that will help us to look at the tackle and see what we can do to make it safer.“My job is to identify risk and then look for solutions and then present those solutions to the law-makers to make the changes that will bring about protection of the athlete.”Several players at the current Rugby World Cup have already suffered head injuries on the field of play, with Argentina‘s Guido Petti suffering a concussion when he collided with Dan Carter in the process of scoring against the All Blacks on Sunday.last_img read more

Saints and Sinners: The weekend’s talking points

first_img The SaintsChiefs duo shine at the StoopHenry Slade had a cracking game for Exeter Chiefs in their 62-24 demolition of Harlequins at the Twickenham Stoop in the last round of Aviva Premiership matches, but Jack Nowell stole all the headlines with his hat-trick of tries.The wing created tries for others as well as scoring his own. His outstanding break from his own half set up a first-half score for James Short, and later Nowell accepted a pass from Phil Dollman, who had in turn been fed deftly by Slade, and strode over the line for his first try.Slade was also critical to Nowell’s second try, sending a long pass over Dollman’s head to find the wing in space and after Nowell had claimed his hat-trick following some sleepy defending by Harlequins, Slade scored one of his own, finishing a great move up the right.Nowell did his share in defence too, stopping Danny Care from burrowing over the line when Quins trailed 17-3 – or at least doing enough to make the referee refer the attempted try to the TMO, who could find no proof the scrum-half had scored. Hat-trick hero: Jack Nowell scores one of his trio of tries against Harlequins. (Photo: Getty Images) Losing his headGlasgow Warriors needed to win at Connacht to earn the right to a home semi-final in the Guinness Pro12 and with half an hour to go the game was poised at 7-7. Then a moment of madness from Sila Puafisi left the Warriors a man down for the remainder of the match and Connacht went on to win 14-7.Silly Sila: Warriors prop Puafisi heads for the stand after being sent off. (Photo: Inpho)The referee had blown for a penalty at a ruck but as Connacht scrum-half Kieran Marmion bent down to pick up the ball which was at his feet, the Glasgow tighthead came diving round the side of the breakdown head first and banged his head into Marmion’s.Referee Ian Davies decided a red card was the appropriate punishment for Puafisi and it’s hard to argue with that. Young star shines to the endOspreys fly-half Sam Davies capped a fine season with another good display off the bench for his region, then picked up the Guinness Pro12 Young Player of the Year award at Sunday’s dinner.In Saturday’s Ospreys v Ulster clash, which Ulster won 46-26, Davies set up a try for another replacement, Tom Grabham with a great break from 40 metres out and a long pass to Grabham as he scorched into the 22. Paddy Jackson covered across to try to prevent the try but Grabham still dived in and turned over to touch the ball down. Treble for LatuNili Latu had the rare distinction – for a No 8 – of scoring all his team’s points in Newcastle Falcons’ 21-15 loss to Sale Sharks. He scored a hat-trick of tries from driving mauls – twice breaking from the back of a maul a few metres out and trundling unopposed round the blindside. Wood fires Saints into EuropeTom Wood played a crucial role in attack and defence as Northampton came from 20-8 down to beat Gloucester 28-20 in the Aviva Premiership and secure a place in next season’s European Champions Cup.The back row set up George North’s second try by realising Gloucester had left the back of a ruck totally unprotected, and he strode over and through it, charged on into the 22 and fed North. That try put the Saints 22-20 up and they kicked on to win from there.Wood made nine carries in all, while in defence his total of 11 tackles beat any of his team-mates. This was a game that mattered for Northampton and Wood was rightly named Man of the Match. What happened? Jack Clifford and Marland Yarde of Harlequins take in the loss. (Photo: Getty Images)The SinnersHarlequins’ horror showIt should have been a fond farewell for Harlequins DoR Conor O’Shea after six mostly happy years at the Stoop, but instead it turned into a horror show for the home side as Exeter trounced them 62-24 and extinguished their hopes of qualifying for the European Champions Cup via a top six Premiership finish.Quins can still get into Europe’s top competition next season if they win the second tier Challenge Cup final on Friday, but they will need to put this awful performance quickly behind them and bring their A game to play Montpellier in Lyon.Danny Care called Saturday “a pretty sour day” and O’Shea said “that will take some getting over”. Quins were poor in all departments and the lead-up to Jack Nowell’s hat-trick try encapsulated everything that was wrong with their game. They overthrew a lineout near their own 22, Exeter hooker Luke Cowan-Dickie gratefully gathered the ball at the tail as if it was a planned move and barrelled up towards the line. The ball squirted out at the side of the ensuing ruck and Quins prop Kyle Sinckler just stood and looked at it on the floor, leaving it for Chiefs scrum-half Will Chudley to pick up and pass out to the right, where Nowell scored.Quins missed a shocking total of 23 tackles and although they occasionally sparkled in attack, they were utterly outmuscled by the Chiefs. O’Shea’s coaching mettle will be tested to the full this week as Harlequins attempt to bounce back and win on Friday. Webb’s wobblesThe Ospreys needed a home win against Ulster to earn a place in next season’s European Champions Cup and to help the Scarlets step over Ulster and into the Pro12 playoffs, but too many errors from the men in black helped the visitors to win 46-26.Weak defending at close quarters allowed Rory Best to score a try and just before half-time Rhys Webb kicked straight to Andrew Trimble, who counter-attacked and put in a return kick of his own. A wicked bounce took the ball away from Webb – who might perhaps have tracked back with more determination – and Trimble was through for a try.Webb was at fault for another try later in the game, when he had the ball at his feet at the back of a ruck inches from his own line, but left it unguarded a fraction too long and Chris Henry reached through from the Ulster side of the ruck and touched it down for a try. Pulling the strings: Kieran Marmion (left) starred for Connacht. (Photo: Inpho)West is bestKieran Marmion was named Man of the Match as Connacht sealed a top-two finish in the Guinness Pro12 with a 14-7 win over Glasgow Warriors in a winner-takes-all match.But Marmion was by no means the only one at Connacht with something to celebrate as the province more or less swept the board at Sunday’s Pro12 annual awards. Bundee Aki was named Player of the Season, Pat Lam Coach of the Season, skipper John Muldoon received the Chairman’s Award in recognition of his 13 years of service and no less than seven Connacht players were named in the Pro12 dream team – Aki, Matt Healy, Marmion, Denis Buckley, Tom McCartney, Finlay Bealham and Ultan Dillane. Saturday brought the last round of matches in the regular season of the Aviva Premiership and the Guinness Pro12. It turned into something of a try-fest, but who contributed to the crucial wins and who fell at the final hurdle? TAGS: ConnachtHighlightSaracens Ash crash: Chris Ashton dives over to help Saracens on their way to a big win. (Photo: Getty Images)Great from Goode, hot stuff from AshChris Ashton scored a hat-trick of tries in Saracens’ 43-19 win over Worcester Warriors, showing all his finishing skills and capitalising on some outstanding play from full-back Alex Goode.Goode created Ashton’s first try when he took a high ball and sidestepped the first line of defence then broke clear and passed to the wing to score in the corner.Ashton collected an awkwardly bouncing ball after a brilliant chip from Goode for his second and replacement Ben Ransom provided the kick for Ashton to chase for his hat-trick touchdown after Goode had gone off early in the second half to rest for next Saturday’s Champions Cup final.An offload from Ashton then set up a try for Ransom, as Saracens showed they are in fine form as the true business end of the season begins. Remember the nameEllis Genge – a former England U20 prop who is on loan at Leicester Tigers from Bristol – made his Premiership debut on Saturday and showed he has what it takes to succeed at the highest level.Leicester lost 38-27 at Bath but it was not for the want of trying on Genge’s part as he excelled in attack and defence. He helped create two tries – one for the excellent Peter Betham and one for Mathew Tait, making a total of 45m with ten carries beating five defenders, and he did his share of defensive work too.If Bristol secure promotion to the Premiership by beating Doncaster Knights in the Greene King IPA Championship playoff final, Genge might be a key figure for them next season. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Brown the try-poacherEdinburgh wing Tom Brown might not be in Matt Scott’s good books after pinching a try from right under the nose of his team-mate. Scott kicked through the Cardiff Blues defence from just outside the 22 and chased the ball to the line, but Brown popped up at his shoulder and dived on the ball first. Scott gave a rueful grin to his team-mate as they got up but might not be entirely impressed with Brown’s cheeky move.last_img read more

Agent defends Dan Carter after claims of drug test ‘anomalies’

first_imgIn the spotlight: Joe Rokocoko also had a therapeutic use exemption because of injury, says his agentBut Porter is quoted as saying the players were “relaxed” about the reports and that Carter was receiving medication for a calf injury that ultimately forced him off the field during the European Champions Cup final against Saracens in May.Rokocoko was recovering from a knee injury.Carter, who was Man of the Match in the Top 14 final, played 112 Tests for New Zealand and was part of the side that won the World Cup a year ago.In his autobiography published last year, he explains that he had a cortisone shot to help get him through the 2013 tour to Europe and another injection after last year’s World Cup pool match against France, having tweaked his MCL. The All Black great had permission to take prescribed medicine ahead of the Top 14 final, says his agent Simon Porter in response to a French newspaper report Rokocoko scored 46 tries in 68 Tests between 2003 and 2010. Dan Carter in action during the Champions Cup final in May, when he left the field injured (Pic: Getty) center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Former All Blacks Dan Carter and Joe Rokocoko gave drug tests which showed “anomalies” before this year’s Top 14 final, according to the French newspaper L’Equipe.But the pair’s manager, Simon Porter, says both had therapeutic use exemptions (TUEs), giving them permission to take prescribed medicines.Porter told the New Zealand Herald: “We have been aware of the issue for a few weeks. Our understanding and assurances we’ve had are that all the documents around TUEs were in place.”Fly-half Carter, 34, and wing Rokocoko, 33, scored 20 points between them as their team, Racing 92, beat Toulon 29-21 in the June final in Barcelona.L’Equipe says players were tested by France’s national anti-doping agency before the final and urine samples from the two revealed traces of corticosteroids, which are designed to reduce inflammation.The newspaper also names a third Racing player, Pumas wing Juan Imhoff, as having anomalies in his urine test.last_img read more

Presiding Bishop issues pastoral letter on Doctrine of Discovery

first_img Doug Desper says: Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs] “We seek to address the need for healing in all parts of society, and we stand in solidarity with indigenous peoples globally to acknowledge and address the legacy of colonial occupation and policies of domination,” Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori wrote in her Pastoral Letter on the Doctrine of Discovery and Indigenous Peoples, issued May 16.“Our Christian heritage has taught us that a healed community of peace is only possible in the presence of justice for all peoples,” Jefferts Schori continued. “We seek to build such a beloved community that can be a sacred household for all creation, a society of right relationships.”On May 7, Jefferts Schori joined other religious voices in repudiating the Doctrine of Discovery at the 11th session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII). The theme for the UNPFII meeting is “The Doctrine of Discovery: its enduring impact on indigenous peoples and the right to redress for past conquests (articles 28 and 37 of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples).”  In 2009, General Convention repudiated the Doctrine of Discovery.The full text of the presiding bishop’s letter is below._______________________________________________Pastoral Letter on the Doctrine of Discovery and Indigenous PeoplesThen God said, “Let us make humankind in our image, according to our likeness; and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the birds of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the wild animals of the earth, and over every creeping thing that creeps upon the earth.”[1]The first biblical creation story tells of the creation of earth, sky, waters, creatures, and gives human beings dominion over the rest.  God pronounces what has been created good.  At the end of the original week of creation, with the advent of human beings, God blesses all of it, and pronounces the work very good[2].The second creation story tells of what goes wrong – the first two earth creatures eat what they have been forbidden to eat, and are then expelled from the garden[3].  They have misunderstood what it means to exercise dominion toward life in the garden.  Through the millennia, many of their offspring have continued to misunderstand dominion, or to willfully twist the divine intent of dominion toward the conceit of domination.  Through the ages, human beings have too often insisted that what exists has been made for their individual use, and that force may be used against anyone who seems to compete for a particular created resource[4].  The result has been enormous destruction, death, despair, and downright evil – what is more commonly called “sin.”The blessings of creation are meant to be stewarded, in the way of husbanding and housekeeping, for the true meaning of dominion is tied to the constellation of meanings around house and household.  There have been strands of the biblical tradition which have kept this sacred understanding alive, but the unholy quest for domination has sought to quench it, in favor of wanton accumulation and exclusive possession of the goods of creation for an individual or a small part of the blessed family of God.After that eviction from the primordial garden, the biblical stories are mostly about how human communities strive to return to a homeland that will be a source of blessing for the community.  Through the long centuries, the prophetic understanding of that community broadens to include all the nations of the earth.  Even so, the seemingly eternal struggle between dominators and stewards has continued to the present day.Most of the passages in the Bible that talk about land are yearning for a fertile place, where people are able to grow crops, tend flocks, and live in peace.  The offspring of those first human beings gave rise to peoples who hungered for land, and many of them did a great deal of violence through the ages in order to occupy and possess it.  They weren’t alone, for the empires of Alexander, Rome, and Genghis Khan were also the result of amassing conquered territory.  The Christian empires of Europe were consumed with battles over land for centuries, and eventually sent military expeditions across the Mediterranean in a quest to re-establish a Christian claim on what they called the Holy Land.The explorers who set out from Christian Europe in the 15th century went with even broader motivations, in search of riches and abundantly fertile lands.  They also went with religious warrants, papal bulls which permitted and even encouraged the subjugation and permanent enslavement of any non-Christian peoples they encountered, as well as the expropriation of any territories not governed by Christians.[5]  Western Christian religious authorities settled competitions over these conquests by dividing up the geography that could be claimed among the various European nations.These religious warrants led to the wholesale slaughter, rape, and enslavement of indigenous peoples in the Americas, as well as in Africa, Asia, and the islands of the Pacific, and the African slave trade was based on these same principles.  Death, dispossession, and enslavement were followed by rapid depopulation as a result of introduced and epidemic disease.  Yet death and dispossession of lands and resources were not a singular occurrence that can be laid up to the depredations of benighted medieval warriors.  They are not akin to Viking raids in the British Isles, or ancient struggles between neighboring tribes in Europe or Africa.  These acts of “Discovery” have had persistent effects on marginalized, transported, and disenfranchised peoples.The ongoing dispossession of indigenous peoples is the result of legal systems throughout the “developed” world that continue to base land ownership on these religious warrants for colonial occupation from half a millennium ago.  These legal bases collectively known as the Doctrine of Discovery underlie U.S. decisions about who owns these lands[6].  The dispossession of First Peoples continues to wreak havoc on basic human dignity.  These principles give the lie to biblical understandings that all human beings reflect the image of God, for those who have been thrown out of their homeland, had their cultures largely erased, and sent into exile, are still grieving their loss of identity, lifeways, and territory.  All humanity should be grieving, for our sisters and brothers are suffering the injustice of generations.  The sins of our forebears are being visited on the children of indigenous peoples, even to the seventh generation.There will be no peace or healing until we attend to that injustice.  The prophets of ancient Israel cried out for justice when their ability to live in the land they saw as home was threatened.  A day laborer named Amos challenged those around him with the word of God, “Let justice roll down like waters, and righteousness like an everflowing stream”[7].  Where there is no justice, there can be no peace for anyone.In the North American context, the poorest of the poor live on Native reservations.  The depth of poverty there is closely followed by the poverty among ghettoized descendants of the indigenous peoples of Africa who were transported to these shores as slaves.  That kind of poverty is also frequent in other parts of the world where indigenous people have been dispossessed and displaced.  Healing is not possible, it is not even imaginable, until the truth is told and current reality confronted.  The basic dignity and human rights of first peoples have been repeatedly transgressed, and the outcome is grievous – poverty, cultural destruction, and multi-generational consequences.  The legacy of grief that continues unresolved is visible in skyrocketing suicide rates, rampant hopelessness, and deep anger.  In many contexts it amounts to pathological or impacted grief – for when hope is absent, healing is impossible.The legacy of domination includes frightful evil – the intentional destruction of food sources and cultural centers like the herds of North American bison, the intentional introduction of disease and poisoning of water sources, wanton disregard of starvation and illness, the abuse and enslavement of women and children, the murder of those with the courage to protest inhumane treatment, the repeated dispossession of natural resources, land, and water, as well as chronically inadequate Federal management and defense of Native rights and resources.There have been some glimmers of justice in decisions that have returned Native fishing and hunting rights, and some improvements in tribal rights to self-determination.  There is a very small and slow return of bison to the prairie, and wolves have begun to return in places where they are not immediately hunted down.  Yet many of these recoveries continue to be strenuously resisted by powerful non-Native commercial interests.There are signs of hope in returning cultural treasures to their communities of origin, and the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act[8] is returning remains for dignified burial.  The legacy of cultural genocide is slowly being addressed as indigenous traditions, languages, and cultural skills are taught to new generations.The Episcopal Church has been present and ministering with Native peoples in North America for several centuries.  That history of accompaniment and solidarity has hardly been perfect, yet we continue to seek greater justice and deeper healing.The Episcopal Church’s relationship with Native peoples in the Americas begins with the first English colonists.  We remember the story of Manteo, a Croatan of what is now North Carolina.  He traveled to England in 1584 and helped a colleague of Sir Walter Raleigh learn to speak Algonquin.  He returned here the next year, became something of an ambassador between the two peoples, was baptized, and is counted a saint of this church[9].Episcopal missionaries have served in a variety of indigenous communities and contexts.  Henry Benjamin Whipple was Bishop of Minnesota in 1862, and his powerful petition to Abraham Lincoln saved the lives of some 265 of the Dakota men sentenced to hang the day after Christmas in Mankato[10].  The Dakota people called him “Straight Tongue.”  Today many Dakota and Lakota people are part of this Episcopal tradition.This Church has stood in solidarity with native peoples in Alaska, Hawai’i, and the American southwest, especially the Diné (Navajo), as well as in urban Indian communities.  The Poarch Band of Creek Indians (in Alabama) achieved federal recognition in the 1980s with the aid of baptismal records maintained by this Church, which also assisted in returning a piece of land to the Poarch Band[11].  A large group of indigenous people in Ecuador is seeking recognition as worshiping communities in the Episcopal tradition, and we have other indigenous members and communities in Colombia, Venezuela, Honduras, and Micronesia.  Our historical presence in the Philippines began with the indigenous Igorot peoples of the mountains and highlands.Healing work continues across The Episcopal Church.  In 1997 Presiding Bishop Edmond Browning apologized for the enormities that began with the colony in Jamestown[12].  Today our understanding of mission has changed.  We believe that God’s mission is about healing brokenness in the world around us – broken relationships between human beings and the Creator, broken relationships between peoples, and damaged relationships between human beings and the rest of creation.  We seek to partner in God’s mission through proclaiming a vision of a healed world; forming Christians as partners in that mission; responding to human suffering around us; reversing structural and systemic injustice; and caring for this earthly garden[13].  We partner with any and all who share a common vision for healing, whether Episcopalian or Christian or not.Work with indigenous peoples in recent years has been intensely focused on issues of poverty and the generational consequences of cultural destruction, the reality of food deserts and diabetes rates on reservations, unemployment and inadequate educational resources, as well as the ongoing reality of racism and exclusion in the larger society[14].  Mission and development work in Native communities is locally directed, honoring the gifts and assets already present[15], and moves toward a vision of healed community.  We partner with White Bison in community organizing that develops training programs for community healing[16].  This is a historic development, the first such partnership between a traditional Native American non-profit and The Episcopal Church.This Church has worked to alleviate systemic and structural injustice in many ways, and our repudiation of the Doctrine of Discovery in 2009 is a recent example[17].  Since at least 1976, our advocacy work has included support for First Nations land claims in Canada, advocacy with the U.S. government for improved health care, religious freedom, preservation of burial sites and repatriation of remains and cultural resources, increased Federal tribal recognition, and critical Federal Government self-examination around Native American rights.  We have affirmed and reaffirmed our desire to strengthen relationships with Native peoples by remembering the past, recognizing the deficits and gifts in our historic and current relationships, and continued work toward healing[18].  We are currently advocating for the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act, with provisions directly affecting Native women.The Doctrine of Discovery work of this Church is focused on education, dismantling the structures and policies based on that ancient evil, support for the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples[19], and challenging governments around the world to support self-determination for indigenous peoples.We seek to address the need for healing in all parts of society, and we stand in solidarity with indigenous peoples globally to acknowledge and address the legacy of colonial occupation and policies of domination.  Our Christian heritage has taught us that a healed community of peace is only possible in the presence of justice for all peoples.  We seek to build such a beloved community that can be a sacred household for all creation, a society of right relationships.But now in Christ Jesus you who once were far off have been brought near by the blood of Christ.  For he is our peace; in his flesh he has made both groups into one and has broken down the dividing wall, that is, the hostility between us… and might reconcile both groups to God in one body through the cross, thus putting to death that hostility through it.  So he came and proclaimed peace to you who were far off and peace to those who were near…  So then you are no longer strangers and aliens, but you are citizens with the saints and also members of the household of God[20] We pray that God will give us the strength and courage to do this work together for the good of all our relations, in the belief that Christ Jesus ends hostility and brings together those who were once divided.The Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts SchoriPresiding Bishop and PrimateThe Episcopal Church An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET May 18, 2012 at 2:39 pm May God, in Her/His grace, make it so. [12] http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1298&dat=19971101&id=LOwyAAAAIBAJ&sjid=UwgGAAAAIBAJ&pg=6997,143732 Submit an Event Listing Posted May 16, 2012 Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Office of Public Affairs, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem [16] http://www.coloradospringsindiancenter.com/2010/04/partnership-white-bison-episcopal-church-alleviate-poverty/ [11] http://www.poarchcreekindians.org/assets/pdf/newsletter_jun_2007.pdf May 18, 2012 at 10:07 am Thank you. Well said. [13] a shorthand summary of the Five Anglican Marks of Mission The Rev. Christopher S. Martin says: Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group [17] http://www.nativevillage.org/Archives/2009%20Archives/Oct%202009%20I%20201%20NV%20News/Episcopal%20Church%20Repudiates%20Doctirine%20of%20Discovery.htm [1] Genesis 1:26 Comments are closed. Rector Collierville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH [7] Amos 5:24 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service [19] http://social.un.org/index/IndigenousPeoples/DeclarationontheRightsofIndigenousPeoples.aspx [15] through Asset-Based Community Development [20] Ephesians 2:13ff Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Tampa, FL Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Events [2] Genesis 1:1-2:3 [6] cf. Johnson v M’Intosh:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johnson_v._M’Intosh [14] http://archive.episcopalchurch.org/native/109407_123131_ENG_HTM.htm Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York John D. Andrews says: [9] http://kingofpeace.blogspot.com/2009/05/manteo-virginia-dare.html Paula M. Jackson says: Doug Desper says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest May 22, 2012 at 10:35 pm It would be a sad commentary on the state of the church if the greatest pain evoked here by the Presiding Bishop’s statement were out of sympathy for the colonists of Jamestown. History is everything; but that must mean that the gravity of history is everything. That means that my history is only one part of our collective history. There are greater–deeper, broader, more long-lasting–griefs than that inflicted on the reputation of some of the Jamestown colonists; and the Presiding Bishop’s statement speaks eloquently to them. Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC center_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Washington, DC Doug Desper says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Catherine Windsor says: Neil Elliott says: Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Comments (9) May 17, 2012 at 10:12 pm E te Pihopa, te rangatira nga mihi whakawhetai ki a koe, mo nga kupu aroha mo nga tangata whenua katoa o te ao!Arohanui – Jenny. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA June 1, 2012 at 12:59 pm I´ve never heard anyone who seeks to repudiate the Doctrine of Discovery in this Church pretend that there is an evil race of whites who inflicted all the world´s injustice on all the indigenous peoples who were perfect innocents. Creating a straw man to fight is a way to avoid the real struggle to which we are called, which is repentance from our own past wrong and conversion to a new redemptive future. There is a time to lift up individual acts of heroism and to study varieties of injustice among the different peoples. But when we are renouncing the Doctrine of Discovery, it is the time for repentance on the part of the Church and its heirs.When I go to confession, it is not time for me to say, ¨But actually, I am not as bad as all that because I did this good deed someone might have overlooked,¨ or ¨I may be bad but don´t forget that the person I offended also did this bad thing that wasn´t reported.¨ Either I am repenting, or I am not repenting of what I acknowledge to be wrong on my part (or I don´t acknowledge to be wrong on my part).It is not a question of ¨who sinned worse?¨ just as it is inappropriate for me to ask that in confession if I´m truly repentant. Bishop Katharine gives us the theological and biblical story which shows us the error of the Doctrine of Discovery. She reminds us of the hideous consequences of the Doctrine of Discovery. We know that this Doctrine was promoted by the Church to justify political and economic ends; and that our Church is not exempt from participating in it. The appropriate response is repentance, acceptance of the means of grace for renewal and amendment of life as persons and as a Body.There are other moments for comparative histories of motives and methods in war amongst the peoples of the various continents. When you start looking closely, I doubt that you can really say with great confidence that one is that much better than another. But you can surely say that we can´t do these things in the name of Christ. May 18, 2012 at 8:29 pm For God, who said, “Let light shine out of darkness,” has shone in our hearts to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ. ( 2 Corinthians 4:6).No ambiguity about God here – the grace of God is known in the man Jesus Christ. [5] Doctrine of Discovery resources:  http://www.episcopalchurch.org/page/doctrine-discovery-resources Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT May 30, 2012 at 10:46 pm Doug,You may be speaking truth, but, in my opinion, it is not an appropriate response to this letter. The Anglican Church (now the Episcopal Church) was responsible for much harm in the name of Jesus. The Presiding Bishop rightly says we must now do what is right. Doing what is right does not require the Church to tell what a great man Robert Hunt was. It does not require us to talk of the troubles between indigenous tribes or wrongs committed by indigenous tribes. It only requires us to own our own misdeeds and work to not repeat them. No where in the Presiding Bishop’s letter, or in any other discussions I have read, or been a part of, have I seen indigenous people being portrayed as being “pure as snow” and Anglos as being evil. Because of the Doctrine of Discovery whole nations were destroyed, languages and cultures have been lost forever. Because of loss of identity there is gang violence, domestic violence, alcoholism, drug addiction, and suicide, all at extremely high levels in indigenous communities. So, I guess compared to the reality of the result of the Doctrine of Discovery, your concerns seem rather petty to me. Jenny Plane Te Paa says: Rector Belleville, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Presiding Bishop issues pastoral letter on Doctrine of Discovery Tags Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Smithfield, NC [10] http://law2.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/dakota/dakota.html [4] Commodification or what Heidegger called Bestand, cf. The Question Concerning Technology or Being and Time Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel [3] Genesis 2:4-3:24 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL [8] http://www.nps.gov/history/nagpra/ Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 [18] cf.  Decade of Remembrance, Recognition, and Reconciliation:  http://www.okiv2010.com/images/03_c008_res_rrr.pdf Indigenous Ministries, May 18, 2012 at 2:03 pm This commentary by the Presiding Bishop is certainly well-stated and I agree with the necessity to call attention to past abuses by opportunistic perpetrators. History has proven that people who wore the name of Christ have not always been faithful servants but more shaped by their culture’s deformities. Healing needs to happen and we should appeal to the Lord’s example to make that step.With that said I am equally critical about the hesitance to not challenge indigenous cultures. Christ came to transform people and cultures – not merely affirm them. Mission opportunities have suffered because of past abuses, including the need to challenge elements of cultural practices that are not Christ-centered. We do not want to devolve this conversation into a debate overly simplified as “evil white Christian males hungry for fortune” vs. “pure as driven snow innocent natives” (speaking of the past).As an 11th generation Virginian I want to challenge the poor research that still lingers surrounding Episcopal Church leader pronouncements about Jamestown – especially the missed opportunities during 2007’s 400th anniversary. Because of oversimplification and accommodation for not wanting to seem insensitive a couple of dramatic stories were missed and the “evil white males seeking fortunes” got the emphasis. Never mentioned adequately was the Rev Robert Hunt, the chaplain to the colony. The first story missed and neglected by our Episcopal leaders was how this chaplain was revered and respected by the colonists during the voyage – even by the less noble among them. Upon landing at Jamestown, Rev Hunt was sick unto death but summoned the strength to demand that no one set foot ashore for three days as their personal penance for infighting among them on the voyage and preparation to respect the natives. The three ships stood anchored with no one coming ashore for the three days in deference to Rev Hunt’s admonishments. What a missed opportunity to state the power of the moment. And then let us not forget that Chief Powhatan was already at war with his neighbors before the colonists arrived. One of Powhatan’s first desires was to use the colonists as allies against his neighbors in the bloody wars that he was engaged in. The colonists arrived in an imperfect world after all.Yes – we need to respect indigenous people – but tell the whole truth. Don’t deify one culture over another because all cultures have deformities in need of redemption. None are wholly pure like none are wholly to blame. Challenge all elements of the culture that need to be shaped by Christ; whether they are native or newcomer. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA May 23, 2012 at 7:34 pm Sorry Neil, but if justice is justice you cannot scape-goat, weigh pain for greater or lesser, negate the troubles of those who endured, or believe that some backs should bear the weight more than the other, seeking some greater gravity of pain. I’m not talking about a mere snubbed “reputation”. I’m talking about telling the whole truth. All cultures are deformed and need the redemption of Christ. I’m sure that King Powhatan’s neighbors didn’t see your fine distinctions as they were being attacked, slaughtered, and enslaved in the years before and after the arrival of the Virginia Company. Likewise, I am sure that these fine distinctions about degrees and gravity of suffering are lost on the Virginia colonists who starved to death, buried their children, or who were attacked by natives (referring to the story of Chanco). Conversely, one need not educate the native Virginia tribes about the duplicity of newcomers. My comment emphasizes that the wearily overused (and erroneous) “default point” of many of these discussions (and pronouncements) is to oversimplify and make all newcomers evil and all natives pure as snow. It just doesn’t work out like that. You can’t have true justice without telling the whole story. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZlast_img read more

Dioceses of Northwestern Pennsylvania, Western New York move toward collaboration

first_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Press Release Service New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Press Release Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Posted May 8, 2018 Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Tampa, FL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Bath, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Curate Diocese of Nebraska Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ [Episcopal Dioceses of Western New York and Northwestern Pennsylvania] The Dioceses of Western New York and Northwestern Pennsylvania have moved one step closer to approving an innovative arrangement under which they would share a bishop and staff for five years while exploring a long-term relationship.The Standing Committees of both dioceses unanimously agreed May 7 to support a proposal under which Bishop Sean W. Rowe of Northwestern Pennsylvania would take on additional responsibility as bishop provisional of the Western New York upon the retirement of Bishop William Franklin of Western New York in April 2019.The plan must now be approved by the annual conventions of both dioceses which will meet jointly in Niagara Falls in October. To complete the arrangement, the Diocese of Western New York would elect Rowe as their next bishop at that same gathering.“We are excited by the opportunity to have Bishop Rowe succeed Bishop Franklin,” said Jim Isaac, president of the Standing Committee in Western New York. “But this partnership is about more than sharing a bishop. It’s about having the courage to experiment and adapt to new realities. Our two dioceses have complementary strengths and we face similar challenges. Together, we are well aligned to respond to what God is doing in our corner of the church.”Jack Malovich, president of the Standing Committee in Northwestern Pennsylvania, said the partnership offers not only financial efficiencies, but opportunities for the two dioceses to work together on region-wide ministries. “The people of our dioceses share an industrial past, a respect for the beauty of the Lake Erie region and a history of resilience,” he said. “We are committed to being part of the Rust Belt resurrection that is already underway in Buffalo, Erie and elsewhere.”Franklin, 71, who holds a doctorate in church history from Harvard University, has served Western New York as bishop for seven years. He was previously dean of Berkeley Divinity School at Yale University. The diocese, with headquarters in suburban Buffalo, comprises 57 parishes in western New York state between Pennsylvania and Canada.Although he has been bishop of Northwestern Pennsylvania for 11 years, Rowe, 43, remains the youngest bishop in the Episcopal Church. He holds a doctorate in organizational development from Gannon University. The diocese, with headquarters in Erie, comprises 33 congregations in the northwestern quarter of Pennsylvania. Rector Collierville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Dioceses of Northwestern Pennsylvania, Western New York move toward collaboration Standing Committees approve arrangement to share a bishop, staff and ministry initiatives Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Albany, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

Diocese of Litoral Ecuador announces search for its third bishop

first_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY [Episcopal Diocese of Litoral Ecuador] The Episcopal Diocese of Litoral Ecuador has started a process of systematic search and nomination for a new bishop.We have undertaken the task assigned to us with faith, prayer, partnership and teamwork as well as the grave responsibility of a transparent process. It gives us the confidence to present a profile of a bishop for the Litoral Diocese to our brothers and sisters all over the world where we the Episcopalians profess the faith in our Lord Jesus Christ in the fellowship of the Anglican Communion.This text presents our first steps in the pastoral life, the spiritual development of a community that always expresses its unity, solidarity, generosity and readiness for service of our brothers and sisters, laypeople, bishops, priests and deacons, towards the people of God, to whom we love in the Lord.Thus, we cordially welcome to those who receive this profile for the search of a new diocesan bishop, always remembering the Apostle Paul’s words to the Corinthians: “For we preach not ourselves, but Christ Jesus the Lord; and ourselves your servants for Jesus’ sake.” (2 Corinthians 4:5).May God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, bless and save us. Amen. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Rector Bath, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Tags An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Province IX The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Press Release Service Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Press Release Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Hopkinsville, KY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Diocese of Litoral Ecuador announces search for its third bishop Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit an Event Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls Posted May 24, 2018 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Bishop Elections, Submit a Job Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Latin America, Rector Martinsville, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS last_img read more

Presiding Bishop wins top broadcasting award for royal wedding sermon

first_img Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Sandford St. Martin Trust     Posted May 13, 2019 Rector Albany, NY Featured Events Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Bath, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Royal Wedding 2018 Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Washington, DC Tags Presiding Bishop wins top broadcasting award for royal wedding sermon Michael Curry recognized for global impact of sermon on theme of love at the marriage of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle in 2018. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Press Release Service Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit an Event Listing Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An estimated 1.9 billion people watched Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, the first African American to head the U.S.-based Episcopal Church, tell a congregation of royals and celebrities that “love is the way.”Curry, presiding bishop and primate of The Episcopal Church, is to receive the 2019 Sandford St. Martin Trustees’ Award in recognition of the huge media impact generated by his royal wedding sermon which helped to bring a better understanding of religious belief and its modern relevance to a new audience.The Rt .Rev. Jan MacFarlane, bishop of Repton and chair of the Sandford St. Martin Trust, said:  “One of the indisputable broadcasting highlights of the 2018 royal wedding was Bishop Curry’s sermon. His words were broadcast around the world and were instrumental in shining a spotlight on the central role faith plays in the wider social discourse, and, on how religion can be both hugely engaging and unifying for the public.“His reminder to audiences of the ‘important stuff’ in life – like fellowship and love – has been crucial at a time such as this, when the social and political divisions in the U.K. and around the world are being so deeply felt.”The Sandford St. Martin Trustees’ Award recognizes individuals, programs or organizations which have made outstanding contributions to their audience’s understanding of religion, ethics or spirituality. Previous recipients include author, journalist and broadcaster Joan Bakewell, composer Sir John Tavener, journalist Lyse Doucet, and, broadcaster and historian Neil MacGregor.The U.K. writer, broadcaster and former chairman of the Equality and Human Rights Commission Trevor Philips will dedicate Curry’s award at a special ceremony at Lambeth Palace on June 13. Curry videotaped his acceptance speech for the ceremony, because a scheduling conflict prevents him from accepting in person.This year’s shortlists, judging panels and previous winners are here.The Sandford St. Martin Trust is an independent, non-profit organization. It has been making annual awards for the best programs about religion, ethics and spirituality since 1978.   The Trust engages with a wide range of media organizations, individual journalists, broadcast content-makers and other media figures, many of whom give their time and expertise voluntarily to support the Trust’s work. This work includes contributing to and participating in conferences, festivals and training as well as on-going public consultations and debates on the future of broadcasting.The Sandford St. Martin Trust supports thought-provoking, distinctive programming that engages with issues of faith, morality and ethics. In recent years the rise of “fake news,” misinformation, hate crimes and an increasingly divided society means the need for religious literacy has never been greater. Submit a Job Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Back to Press Releases Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR last_img read more