Study explores if CPAP treatment can improve sexual QOL for sleep apnea

first_img Source:https://media.jamanetwork.com/news-item/will-treating-sleep-apnea-with-cpap-improve-sexual-quality-of-life/ May 24 2018Bottom Line: Long-term use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for obstructive sleep apnea was associated an improvement in sexual quality of life for women, but not men.Why The Research Is Interesting: Obstructive sleep apnea reduces sexual quality of life (QOL) as a result of reduced libido and intimacy, erectile dysfunction and several other factors. Treatment for obstructive sleep apnea may improve sexual QOL.Related StoriesSleep quality and fatigue among women with premature ovarian insufficiencyUnpleasant experiences could be countered with a good night’s REM sleepHigh sleep variability and short sleep duration predict blunted weight lossWho and When: 182 patients with newly diagnosed obstructive sleep apnea who were prescribed CPAP treatment from September 2007 through June 2010.What (Study Exposures and Outcomes): Use (more than 4 hours per night) or nonuse (fewer than 0.5 hours per night) of CPAP treatment (exposures); sexual QOL as determined by a survey (outcomes)How (Study Design): This was an observational study. Researchers were not intervening for purposes of the study and cannot control all the natural differences that could explain the study findings.Authors: Sebastian M. Jara, M.D., University of Washington, Seattle, and coauthorsStudy Limitations: The measurement of sexual QOL in this study was not from a dedicated sexual QOL survey, which may have been more sensitive for measuring sexual dysfunction.​last_img read more

Scientists point to potentially promising treatment target for deadly brain cancers

first_img Source:https://www.cincinnatichildrens.org/news/release/2018/brain-cancers Jun 18 2018Scientists report finding a potentially promising treatment target for aggressive and deadly high-grade brain cancers like glioblastoma. But they also say the current lack of a drug that hits the molecular target keeps it from being advanced for testing as a therapeutic strategy for patients with few treatment options.Publishing their data online June 18 in Nature Cell Biology, researchers at the Cincinnati Children’s Cancer and Blood Diseases Institute point to a protein that helps regulate cell metabolism called AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase). Their data suggest AMPK is a key driver of the mostly untreatable brain cancers, and blocking it may produce therapeutic benefit for very ill patients.But the finding also challenges the scientific status quo regarding AMPK. This is because current research literature characterizes it as a cancer suppressor, according to the study’s senior investigators, Biplab Dasgupta, PhD, and first author Rishi Raj Chhipa, PhD-;both scientists in the Division of Oncology at Cincinnati Children’s.”AMPK is considered to play a suppressive role in cancer because it inhibits cancer-promoting enzymes like mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and acetyl Co-A carboxylase (ACC),” Dasgupta said. “Our study uses analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas to show that AMPK proteins are highly expressed in lethal human glioblastoma, that inhibiting AMPK by genetic means shrinks brain tumors and prolongs survival in mice. It also shows that deleting AMPK from the whole body of adult mice is safe for the animals.”The Cancer Genome Atlas is a collaboration between the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the National Human Genome Research Institute that has generated comprehensive, multi-dimensional maps of the key genomic changes in 33 types of cancer. According to the NCI, the database is publicly available, making it helpful to the cancer research community to improve the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer.Although data in the current study support the feasibility of using pharmacological inhibitors of AMPK to treat glioblastoma, years of additional research are needed before it will be known if the findings are clinically relevant. “We are hopeful our studies will encourage pharmaceutical companies to screen for AMPK inhibitors,” Dasgupta said.Investigators are planning the next research phases that will be needed to translate the findings to patient care. Dasgupta explained that fostering research collaborations with companies or other institutions with expertise in developing pharmaceutical compounds would help advance the potential therapeutic strategy.Related StoriesWearing a hearing aid may mitigate dementia riskPosterior parietal cortex plays crucial role in making decisions, research showsStudy provides new insight into longitudinal decline in brain network integrity associated with agingMolecular HijackingCancer cells-;high-grade brain cancer cells in particular-;manage to survive in a highly stressful tumor environment. But the tumor cells maintain their ability to aggressively expand. Although medical science has been able to leverage this stress in part to find effective treatments for a large number of cancers, high-grade brain cancers like glioblastoma remain especially stubborn survivors, defying every treatment strategy thrown at them.But the current study’s authors found that cancer-associated stress chronically activates AMPK, which normally works as a bioenergetic sensor that helps regulate cell metabolism and stress. They also learned that brain tumor cells hijack a molecular stress- and metabolism-management process regulated by AMPK to help cancer cells maintain their survival abilities.After discovering this, Dasgupta and colleagues genetically deleted AMPK in human glioblastoma cells and transplanted them into mouse brains. Tumors grew, but very slowly and this prolonged the animals’ survival. “It remains to be seen if inhibiting AMPK in combination with standard of care therapy prolongs survival even further.”Cancer EvolutionIn the course of their research, Chhipa and Dasgupta observed something critical they said could change the way scientists interpret data from cell culture models. The observation also underscores how high-grade brain gliomas are able to evolve genetically to evade targeted molecular treatments, according to the scientists.They noticed that while AMPK was necessary for the survival of patient-derived stem-like cancer cells recently derived from fresh cancer tissue, the protein was not required for the survival of traditional glioblastoma cell lines cultured for decades.”Decades of culture could have altered genetic, epigenetic and metabolic characteristics of the lines, which adapted AMPK-independent survival pathways,” said Dasgupta.Because the large majority of cancer research still relies on cell culture models, Dasgupta said that the study’s findings could become important for the research community, particularly when metabolic pathways of cancer cells are investigated.last_img read more

Groundbreaking discovery could be key to preventing cancer metastasis

first_imgJun 21 2018A groundbreaking discovery by University of Alberta researchers has identified previously-unknown therapeutic targets that could be key to preventing the spread of cancer.In a new study published in Nature Communications, the team found that by inhibiting several newly identified gene targets they could block more than 99.5 percent of cancer metastasis in living cells.”The potential significance is incredible,” said John Lewis, the Alberta Cancer Foundation Frank and Carla Sojonky Chair in Prostate Cancer Research at the U of A and a member of the Cancer Research Institute of Northern Alberta (CRINA). “Metastasis kills 90 percent of all patients with cancer. With this study we have discovered 11 new ways to potentially end metastasis.”In the study, the team used a unique platform it created–a shell-less avian embryo–to visualize the growth and spread of cancer cells in real time. The researchers used a molecular tool called a knockout library to insert short hairpin RNA (shRNA) vectors into cancer cells, which bound to specific genes in the cells and stopped them from activating. They then inserted those cancer cells into the embyros and observed as they formed clusters of cancer, identifying which ones showed properties of being non-metastatic.”When we found compact colonies [of cancer], that meant all the steps to metastasis were blocked,” said Konstantin Stoletov, lead author of the study and a research associate in the Lewis lab. “After that we could pull them out, query what the gene is, and then validate that the gene is actually responsible for metastasis.”The approach enabled the team to detect and identify 11 genes that appear to play essential roles in cancer cell metastasis. According to the researchers, these genes are widely involved in the process of metastasis and not unique to any one cancer.Related StoriesNew research links “broken heart syndrome” to cancerNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer riskThey now plan to test the metastasis-associated genes and gene products as drug targets with an aim of stopping metastasis.”We know that cancer, once it becomes metastatic, will continue to seed other parts of the body and the disease will progress and get worse because of that,” said Lewis. “So I think if we can stop metastasis at any step of progression in cancer patients, we’re going to have a significant effect on survival.”The team is now hoping to progress to human trials over the next few years. The Lewis lab is also expanding efforts to explore for other types of genes called microRNAs that may present even stronger therapeutic targets for preventing metastasis.The research was funded by the Canadian Cancer Society and the Alberta Cancer Foundation.”As the largest national charitable funder of cancer research, we are committed to funding the very best cancer research in Canada,” said Judy Bray, VP Research at the Canadian Cancer Society. “We are proud to have supported the work of Lewis and his team in developing this innovative new imaging tool and applying it to broaden our understanding of cancer metastasis. Discoveries like this will provide new leads on how we can block cancer from spreading and improve the outcomes of those affected by this disease.””Our donors have been proud to be supporting Dr. Lewis and his team for years and this is exactly the type of return on investment we like to see,” said George Andrews, President and CEO of the Alberta Cancer Foundation. “This groundbreaking research has a direct impact on improving treatment for patients and beyond and we are excited to see it translate into real outcomes for Albertans facing cancer.” Source:http://www.med.ualberta.ca/last_img read more

Red blood cells contribute to cardiovascular diseases in patients with type 2

first_imgAug 6 2018Harmful effects of substances secreted from red blood cells could explain the increased risk of cardiovascular diseases in patients with type 2 diabetes, the results of two new studies conducted at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden indicate.It is a known fact that patients with diabetes are at considerable risk of developing cardiovascular diseases caused by organ-vessel damage that leads to heart attack, stroke, kidney disease, eye damage etc. Patients with diabetes also have a worse prognosis following a heart attack. However, the underlying causes of cardiovascular injury in diabetes are largely unknown, and there is no specific treatment to prevent it.Related StoriesDon’t ignore diastolic blood pressure values, say researchersDiabetes patients experiencing empathy from PCPs have beneficial long-term clinical outcomesUranium toxicity might have caused obesity and diabetes in Kuwait, finds new studyResearch suggests that the red blood cells that transport oxygen to the body’s tissues are more inclined to adhere to the vessel wall in diabetes. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have now studied how red blood cells change in type 2 diabetes and if they contribute to the cardiovascular injury occurring. Their results are presented in The Journal of the American College of Cardiology and JACC: Basic to Translational Science.”We found that healthy blood vessels exposed to red blood cells from patients with type 2 diabetes suffer damage to their innermost cell layers, the endothelial cells,” says Professor John Pernow at Karolinska Institutet’s Department of Medicine in Solna who led both the studies. “This phenomenon, which is called endothelial dysfunction, appears early on in the development of diabetes-related vessel injury and greatly reduces the ability of the vessels to dilate while aggravating the inflammation.”Using an experimental model, the team was also able to show that red blood cells from diabetic patients or diabetic mice impair heart function and cause greater myocardial injury in the event of a heart attack than red blood cells from healthy individuals. Their detailed analyses of rat and human blood vessels also demonstrate that the harmful effects are caused by elevated activity of the enzyme arginase, reduced production of the vasodilating molecule nitric oxide and increased formation of harmful oxygen-derived free radicals in the red blood cells.”We also found that treatment that targeted arginase or oxygen-derived free radicals normalised red blood cell function, which meant that their harmful effect on cardiovascular function could be prevented,” explains Professor Pernow. “Our hope is that this knowledge will give rise to new treatments, specifically targeted at red blood cells, that prevent vascular injury and protect the heart in the event of heart attack in patients with type 2 diabetes.” Source:https://ki.se/en/news/red-blood-cells-cause-cardiovascular-injury-in-type-2-diabeteslast_img read more

New approach to assess kidney tumors could prevent patients from undergoing unnecessary

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Aug 29 2018A research team from Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center has discovered a way to use computed tomography (CT) imaging to assess kidney tumors that test positive for the biomarker CD117 and accurately determine – before surgery – whether the tumor is benign or malignant. The findings have been published in Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR).”A persistent problem in kidney cancer diagnosis has been the inability to reliably determine whether a kidney tumor is cancerous without undergoing surgery to remove the tumor, and sometimes the whole kidney too,” says senior author Eric Kauffman, MD, a staff physician and Assistant Professor of Oncology in the Department of Urology at Roswell Park. Surgery for benign kidney tumors is associated with frequent perioperative morbidity and an estimated annual healthcare cost approaching $100 million in the United States alone.Kidney tumors are one of the few tumor types for which a biopsy cannot always confirm the diagnosis as cancerous or benign, explains Dr. Kauffman. A fine-needle aspiration biopsy doesn’t provide enough tissue to make the diagnosis. And while a needle-core biopsy usually can, there’s an important exception. When a tumor biopsy tests positive for the biomarker CD117, the diagnosis is narrowed to two potential conclusions: renal oncocytoma, a benign kidney tumor that is not dangerous, and chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (ChRCC), a potentially life-threatening form of kidney cancer.Biopsies of these two tumor types often look nearly identical under the microscope, sharing characteristic features such as the shape and color of the tumor cells, the appearance of the nuclei and the pattern in which the cells are laid out in the tissue. In addition, they typically share a unique biomarker profile that helps pathologists to differentiate these two tumor types from other kidney tumor types -; but often not from each other.To be on the safe side, most doctors recommend surgery to remove the tumor or kidney, and may even skip the biopsy since they believe it cannot reliably prove the tumor is benign, Dr. Kauffman explains. In addition, performing needle-core biopsies on the kidney is challenging and requires interventional radiologists with unique training and specialization in this approach. “Roswell Park is fortunate to have interventional radiologists with kidney tumor biopsy expertise, and who are aided by cytopathologists present during the biopsy to ensure biopsy accuracy in real time,” he says.Related StoriesTen-fold rise in tongue-tie surgery for newborns ‘without any real strong data’Researchers investigate whether hypertension poses health risk to older kidney donorsLow dose of endotoxin could have protective effect on men at risk of acute kidney injuryDr. Kauffman’s team of urologists, radiologists and pathologists looked at 124 patients with oncocytoma or ChRCC tumors at Roswell Park. Patients diagnosed from 2003 to 2012 represented a retrospective study group to identify the clinical and radiographic variables associated with the benign condition versus the malignant one, particularly when the signature CD117 biomarker was positive. The team then tested variables prospectively on patients from 2013 to 2017 to validate their findings.The team found several differentiating factors: larger tumor size and younger patient age were associated with the cancerous tumor type, whereas multiple tumors present simultaneously were associated with the benign condition. However, the most reliable variable was a measurement determined using multiphase contrast CT scanning, which the research team called the tumor-to-cortex Peak Early-phase Enhancement Ratio (PEER).When a patient receives contrast dye through an IV for a CT scan, it makes the kidney and tumor appear brighter on the scan images. Tumor-to-cortex PEER refers to the level of brightness of the tumor compared to the brightness of the rim (cortex) of the kidney. A CT scan is first done without contrast dye, and then another scan with contrast is taken just as the dye is entering the kidney, referring to “early-phase enhancement,” rather than when the contrast leaves the kidney. Essentially, when a CD117-positive tumor appears brighter than the rest of the kidney, it’s more likely to be benign, and when it’s darker, it’s more likely to be cancer.Among the retrospective cases, the Roswell Park-developed PEER algorithm classified each one correctly as oncocytoma or ChRCC, except for four cancer cases that were misclassified by PEER as benign. Intriguingly, all four misclassified cases tested negative for the signature CD117 biomarker; among CD117-positive tumors, diagnosis using PEER was 100% accurate. In the prospective cohort, PEER was validated to have 100% diagnostic accuracy among 22 additional CD117-positive oncocytoma or ChRCC tumors. Furthermore, perfect accuracy was reproducible among different doctors who separately interpreted all CT scans.”This new approach may finally allow reliable diagnosis of benign kidney tumors among the CD117-positive variants, which could prevent thousands of kidney tumor patients from undergoing unnecessary and often risky operations in the U.S. each year,” says Dr. Kauffman. Source:https://www.roswellpark.org/last_img read more

Acoustic tags track frenzy swimming in baby sea turtles

first_imgAs soon as a baby sea turtle hatches, it races to the water’s edge and vanishes into the waves. Scientists have used small satellite transmitters to track older, juvenile sea turtles; they’ve never been able to follow the hatchlings. But now researchers on the island of Boa Vista in Cape Verde (off the coast of West Africa) report tracking 11 hatchling loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) for more than 8 hours, after the tiny animals first set flippers into the sea. The scientists recorded the animals’ journeys via nanoacoustic tags glued to the hatchlings’ shells (pictured), which sent a ping that the researchers recorded and later used to plot the animals’ latitude and longitude as they traveled. The glue dissolves after a few days, and the tags were sufficiently small so as not to interfere with the turtles’ movements. The hatchlings proved to be mighty swimmers and traveled as fast as 60 meters per minute once they hit the ocean’s currents that helped transport them. After the first 8 hours, some had traveled more than 15 kilometers from their starting point, the scientists report online today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Their speedy departure (known as a frenzy swimming) helps them escape numerous coastal predators. Turtles released on both southern and northwestern beaches eventually caught currents that will ultimately transport them to the Sargasso Sea in the North Atlantic, where they will feed for several years before returning to their natal island. The study should help conservation efforts to protect endangered and threatened sea turtle species by filling in this previously unknown period of their migrations.last_img read more

Video Water droplets leap spontaneously into the air

first_imgBouncing water droplets can get higher with every hop—weird enough for you? In fact, researchers have made it happen for the first time, and today in Nature they describe the strange phenomenon, called trampolining. It requires two ingredients: low air pressure and a “superhydrophobic” surface that fiercely repels water. This surface is composed of tiny pillars and treated with a water-repellant coating. When the scientists put a droplet of water on the surface, the pillars support the water and create a layer of air between the droplet and the surface—like a ball resting on a bed of nails. As the water naturally evaporates, the vapor fills the area in between the pillars below the droplet, building pressure. Result: The droplet spontaneously leaps into action—gaining airtime with every bound, just as a gymnast would on a trampoline. At higher pressure, the droplets can perform a different trick, called “ice levitation.” Evaporation cools the water until it freezes, and a droplet’s vapor kicks it off of the surface as it solidifies into ice. After launch, the frozen pellet lands back on the ground, dead in its tracks. The researchers hope similar surfaces could help make winter roads less icy and kitchen countertops easier to clean.last_img read more

This nifty map shows why coal power is struggling Trump notwithstanding

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Cheapest power source Wind Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Posted in: ClimateTrump administration President-elect Donald Trump has vowed to revive the flagging U.S. coal industry, but a new analysis suggests cheap natural gas and falling prices for wind and solar power mean there are few places where it makes sense to build a new coal-fired power plant.To boost coal power, Trump has promised to dismantle the centerpiece of President Barack Obama’s climate change initiatives, regulations dubbed the Clean Power Plan (CPP) that would restrict greenhouse gas pollution from electricity plants. Republicans have derided the plan as part of Obama’s “war on coal,” and the U.S. Supreme Court has put a hold on the regulations pending the resolution of a legal challenge. But even without the CPP, coal already can’t compete with other energy sources in most of the country when it comes to building new power plants, suggests a new computer model from researchers at the University of Texas (UT) in Austin. Solar Natural gas Warren Cornwall is freelance journalist in Washington State. Hungry elephants fight climate change one mouthful at a time Current With Clean Power Plan Clean Power Plan and cost of pollution impacts Nuclear Coal (Graphic) J. You/Science; (Data) Joshua Rhodes, Energy Institute, The University of Texas in Austin As the first map below shows, even without the CPP, gas and wind (pink and medium blue) are already the cheapest new power sources in nearly 75% of the nation’s 3110 counties.Tack on the CPP (middle map), which would require coal plants to capture some of their carbon emissions, and coal (red) cedes more territory to wind and natural gas.And coal disappears from the map if you add the environmental and public health costs associated with various energy sources (the third map), including a $62 per metric ton price on carbon dioxide emissions. And nuclear power (light blue) expands. doi:10.1126/science.aal0523 Warren Cornwall Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Twitter Email Warren More from News The mammoth analysis suggests that “it might be that decarbonization [of the U.S. electrical grid] is able to be met even without the Clean Power Plan,” says Michael Webber, an engineer and deputy director of UT’s Energy Institute, which conducted the research. “The big thing is if gas stays low [in price] then coal has a tough time.”The work is part of a broader initiative at the institute, aimed at tallying all the costs that come with keeping the lights on, from environmental impacts to building transmission lines or responding to regulations. Snazzy online calculators and mapping tools that accompany the new model enable users to tweak a number of variables, including gas prices and environmental costs, and see how the nation’s energy future might change, at the level of individual counties.The work has its limitations. The Obama regulations would have the biggest impact on whether existing coal plants are shut down, and that wasn’t included in the model. (An Energy Information Administration study published this past June suggests the plan would shrink coal’s overall share of the electrical grid from 33% in 2015 to 21% in 2030; even without the plan, coal’s share would still shrink to 30%.) Also, although the model breaks things down to the individual county, the electrical grid doesn’t follow county lines, and the maps also don’t take into account which areas use the most electricity.Still, Webber says the visualizations could help utilities, regulators, and advocacy groups communicate with the broader public about the different forces shaping the evolution of the nation’s electrical grid.For example, in the first map above that reflects current conditions, gas tops the list chiefly in the West and Southeast, whereas wind wins out in much of the Midwest, parts of the Appalachians, and the Northeast. Solar enjoys an advantage in 13% of counties, chiefly in the sunny Southeast and Southwest. Coal is the cheapest in 10% of counties, primarily in the Southeast and Appalachian coal country.In contrast, in the middle map with the CPP, coal becomes the cheapest option in just 3% of counties, mostly because the plants might need to install costly carbon capture systems.And nuclear power becomes one of the big winners if you add other environmental and health costs to the CPP (the third map). Nuclear becomes the cheapest alternative in 13% of counties, displacing coal and, perhaps surprisingly, nudging out solar power in parts of the Southeast, Midwest, and Northwest. That’s because it takes a lot of energy to build solar panels, says Joshua Rhodes, a UT engineer involved in developing the model. (The model doesn’t account for the cost of disposing of the nuclear waste, beyond a fee the federal government charges nuclear power plants.) Trump White House shelves ‘adversarial’ review of climate science Trump officials deleting mentions of ‘climate change’ from U.S. Geological Survey press releaseslast_img read more

So much for the abominable snowman Study finds that yeti DNA belongs

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Eight out of nine samples purported to be remains of yetis (artist’s sketch, above) were actually those of bears, a new genetic analysis reveals. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Icon Films Ltd. To find out for sure, Lindqvist and her colleagues took a more thorough look at the mtDNA of as many samples of supposed yeti remains as she could get her hands on. Some were obtained when she worked with a U.K. production crew on the 2016 documentary Yeti or Not?, which sought to sift fact from folklore. The filmmakers got hold of a tooth and some hair collected on the Tibetan Plateau in the late 1930s, as well as a sample of scat from Italian mountaineer Reinhold Messner’s museum in the Tyrolean Alps. More recent samples included hair collected in Nepal by a nomadic herdsman and a leg bone found by a spiritual healer in a cave in Tibet. The team also analyzed samples recently collected from several subspecies of bears native to the area, including the Himalayan brown bear, the Tibetan brown bear, and the black bear. Altogether, the scientists analyzed 24 samples, including nine purported to be from yeti. Email Hikers in Tibet and the Himalayas need not fear the monstrous yeti—but they’d darn well better carry bear spray. DNA analyses of nine samples purported to be from the “abominable snowman” reveal that eight actually came from various species of bears native to the area.In the folklore of Nepal, the yeti looms large. The creature is often depicted as an immense, shaggy ape-human that roams the Himalayan hinterlands. Purported sightings over the years, as well as scattered “remains” secreted away in monasteries or held by shamans, have hinted to some that the yeti is not merely a mythical boogeyman.But science has not borne this out so far. Previous genetic analyses of a couple of hair samples collected in India and Bhutan suggested that one small stretch of their mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)—the genetic material in a cell’s power-generating machinery that’s passed down only by females—resembled that of polar bears. That finding hinted that a previously unknown type of bear, possibly a hybrid between polar bears and brown bears, could be roaming the Himalayas, says Charlotte Lindqvist, an evolutionary biologist at the State University of New York in Buffalo. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The Yeti, illustration from “Monsters and Mythic Beasts” 1975 (color litho), D’Achille, Gino (1935–2017)/Private Collection/Bridgeman Images By Sid PerkinsNov. 28, 2017 , 7:01 PM Of the nine purported yeti remains analyzed in a new study, eight of them (including the fragment of leg bone seen above) came from bears.  So much for the abominable snowman. Study finds that ‘yeti’ DNA belongs to bears Of the nine “yeti” samples, eight turned out to be from bears native to the area, the researchers report today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The other sample came from a dog. Similar studies of hair samples supposedly related to North America’s big hairy hominid, the sasquatch (aka Bigfoot), have revealed that those fibers came from bears, horses, dogs, and a variety of other creatures—even a human.Debunking aside, the new study also yielded lots of scientifically useful info, Lindqvist says. The analyses generated the first full mitochondrial genomes for the Himalayan brown bear (Ursus arctos isabellinus) and the Himalayan black bear (Ursus thibetanus laniger), for example. That could help scientists figure out how genetically different these rare subspecies are from more common species, as well as the last time these groups shared maternal ancestors in the past.“It’s great that we now know these bears’ place in the maternal family tree,” says Beth Shapiro, an evolutionary biologist at the University of California, Santa Cruz, who was not involved with the work.“These guys did a pretty good job,” adds Todd Disotell, a biological anthropologist at New York University in New York City. One finding—that the Himalayan brown bear and the Tibetan brown bear had such clearly distinct mtDNA—was surprising, he notes, because subspecies are often genetically similar: “I didn’t expect that.”He wonders whether future analyses of these bears’ nuclear DNA (which contains genetic contributions from both the mother and the father) will tell the same story. Male and female bears lead different lifestyles: Mama bears generally don’t wander much beyond their home territory, whereas male bears roam over much larger ranges. So, he suggests, the nuclear genomes of these subspecies might reveal that they’re hybridized more than the mtDNA suggests.At the very least, when researchers return to the Himalayas to collect new samples, they won’t have to be so concerned about stumbling into the clutches of the infamous yeti.last_img read more

Queen Alexandras Missing Dress Found in an Attic

first_imgShe was seen as one of the most beautiful and elegantly dressed queens that England ever had, but after the death of Queen Alexandra in 1925, many of her dresses were sold or disappeared. Now they are coming to light, one by one, including the latest discovery: a lovely velvet evening dress embellished with beads and sequins that had been carefully stored in a woman’s attic for years.It happened because of an appeal made last year by curators of a royal exhibition at the Fashion Museum in Bath, asking for the return of missing dresses made for Queen Alexandra, wife of King Edward VII. Alexandra, born a princess of Denmark, is the great-grandmother of Elizabeth II.Alexandra of Denmark (1844-1925)The Fashion Museum of Bath, putting together a “family tree” of royal fashion, focused on Queen Alexandra, Queen Mary, Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, and Princess Margaret.Reported The Telegraph: “With loans from the Royal Collection and many items from its own archives, the museum will showcase the stories of how the dresses came to light, and how thrifty Queens had them adapted to suit their changing lifestyles.”Alexandra of Denmark with her mother Louise of Hesse-Kassel and her daughter Louise, Princess Royal and Duchess of Fife. Photo by Peter Symonds CC BY-SA 4.0Curator Elly Summers said in the article: “In the 1960s, we had a donation of two dresses, both belonging to Queen Alexandra. They were chosen from a selection of eight that were found at an old shop in London called Baroque, which was on Margaret Street.”Saying, “We’d love to know what happened to the rest of them,” Summers asked for people to come forward with Queen Alexandra’s dresses coming from that shop or anywhere else.In response, Francesca Counsell Risius got in touch with the city’s Fashion Museum, saying she had a dress that she believed was a bought as a royal curiosity for her great aunt’s shop in Tunbridge Wells in the 1950s.Portrait of Queen Alexandra, when Princess of Wales, with FaceyThe evening dress was designed for the Queen by London dressmaker Barolet in the early 1900s and it bears her signature black and gold name tag sewn into the waist tape. Many dresses were produced by French dressmakers at the time. Barolet was English and also dressed actresses of the Edwardian era, including Ethel Irving for a number of productions between 1911 and 1914.Risius told the BBC that the dress was her great aunt’s prized possession.“She gave me the dress in the late 1960s and I’ve kept it in a box ever since,” she said. “I’ve carefully tried it on a couple of times, so has my daughter and occasionally we’ve taken it out of its tissue paper to show interested friends and family.”(Photo credit TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)The dress’s authenticity was verified by dress historian Dr. Kate Strasdin, who said she was “delighted” that the dress had come to light.“This dress is a fabulous find, not just because of its beauty, but because of what the dress reveals about Alexandra’s fashion choices,” she said. “Placing orders with smaller, less well-known dressmakers such as Barolet shows a measure of Alexandra’s determination to dress apart from her peers.”Related Video: Famous People and their Famous last Romantic wordsAlexandra was born on December 1, 1844, in the Yellow Palace in Copenhagen. Her sister Dagmar would marry a Russian prince and become Czarina, the mother of the last of the Romanovs, Nicholas II. Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, is also a member of the Danish royal family. His great-grandfather was Christian IX of Denmark, Alexandra’s father.Queen AlexandraQueen Victoria and Prince Albert, worried that their oldest son, called Bertie, was becoming too wild, were eager for him to marry. Alexandra was considered the most eligible princess of Europe. The families arranged for Alexandra and Bertie to meet when she was just 16 and he was 19.Queen Victoria with the five surviving children of her daughter, Princess Alice, dressed in mourning clothing for their mother and their sister Princess Marie in early 1879.Prince Albert was particularly determined that his son should marry Alexandra. After Albert’s death, which devastated Victoria, the marriage went ahead. Alexandra was celebrated for her beauty and slender figure–she had a 22 inch waist–and as Princess of Wales, she became a fashion leader.“Alix made the new court the leader of fashion,” wrote Jane Ridley in The Heir Apparent. “Whatever she wore, other women rushed to follow.”The couple had six children. However, throughout much of the marriage, Bertie continued to take mistresses and lead a playboy life. At the same time, Alexandra became increasingly deaf.In 1901, Victoria died, and  Bertie became King Edward VII and Alexandra his queen consort.  She was popular with the public. She was photographed more than many other other queens and queen consorts of the 20th century.Alexandra was passionately opposed to Germany and is thought to have influenced her husband in his attitude toward his nephew, Kaiser Wilhem.Her husband died in 1910, and she continued her public duties as Queen Mother until she became too ill. She died on November 25, 1925 of a heart attack.Read another story from us: Family Feud – The WWI Monarchs of England, Germany, and Russia Were CousinsAlexandra’s dresses were not kept and preserved but mostly dispersed, although the reason is not clear. The black evening dress that has been donated to the Fashion Museum of Bath will be displayed until spring of 2019.last_img read more

Small brush fire along Highway 77

first_img RelatedSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Ad July 3, 2018 Small brush fire along Highway 77center_img Photo Courtesy of Taylor Snowflake Fire & Medical DepartmentThe Taylor Snowflake Fire and Medical Department with help from the Snowflake Taylor Police Department responded to a small brush fire along Highway 77 near Show Low Creek on Thursday, June 28. Crews extinguished the fire quickly. The cause of the fire is unknown, but authorities would like to remind motorists to always check their vehicles when traveling.last_img

Irans Khamenei Tehran will not abandon its missile programme

first_img UK says seized Iranian oil tanker could be released 0 Comment(s) With Iran deal teetering on brink, Europeans assess next steps Advertising Hassan Rouhani says Iran ready to talk to US if sanctions lifted Reacting to those comments, Khamenei said in a speech broadcast on state television: “The U.S. president recently said Iran can achieve development with its current leaders. That means they do not seek regime change … But this political trick will not deceive Iranian officials and the Iranian nation.”“In the missile programme, they know we have reached a point of deterrence and stability. They want to deprive us from it, but they will never succeed,” Khamenei said, speaking at a ceremony marking the 30th anniversary of the death of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, founder of the Islamic Republic of Iran.Khamenei said U.S. sanctions have created hardship for Iranians and called on the government to make improving economic conditions its top priority.President Hassan Rouhani, who has taken a softer stance, suggested last week that Iran might be willing to hold talks if the United States showed it respect and lifted sanctions.U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said on Sunday the United States was prepared to engage with Iran without pre-conditions about its nuclear programme. Iran dismissed the offer as “word-play”. Donald Trump, Jerusalem, Israel, Palestine, Israel capital, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, Trump moves US embassy, Palestine conflict, indian express Iran PresidentAyatollah KhameiniIran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei said on Tuesday that Tehran would not be “deceived” by U.S. President Donald Trump’s offer of negotiations and would not give up its missile programme. By Reuters |London | Published: June 4, 2019 10:09:46 pm Related News Iran and the United States have been drawn into starker confrontation in the past month, a year after Washington pulled out of a deal between Iran and global powers to curb Tehran’s nuclear programme in return for lifting international sanctions.Trump has condemned the nuclear deal, signed by his predecessor Barack Obama, as flawed for not being permanent and for not covering Iran’s ballistic missile programme and its role in conflicts around the Middle East. He has called on Iran to come to negotiating table to reach a new deal.Trump said last week that Iran “has a chance to be a great country, with the same leadership. We’re not looking for regime change. I just want to make that clear. We’re looking for no nuclear weapons.” Advertisinglast_img read more

JK officer who sought stiffer terms for Kathua convicts is transferred

first_img Best Of Express PDP founding member resigns from party, says it has ‘upended’ after Mufti’s death “This (shifting of IGP Mujataba) is de-motivating for the police officers,” said a senior J-K Police officer. “Instead of appreciating their hard work, when you move officers like this, it sends a wrong message in the belt force. Such moves discourage the officers”.IGP Mujtaba handled the politically charged rape and murder case of the eight-year-old Bakerwal girl at Rasana village of Kathua in Jammu last year. With at least two of the then BJP ministers backing the group which was supporting the accused, IGP Mujtaba formulated a Special Investigation Team (SIT) comprising of officers from across the state. Congress’ Vikramaditya Singh lands in trouble for tweets on 1931 Kashmir agitation Amid tight security, 14th batch of 5,210 pilgrims leave Jammu for Amarnath Jammu and Kashmir, J&K police, Kathua gangrape and murder case, Ahfad-ul-Mujtaba, Ahfad-ul-Mujtaba transfer, Indian expre Inspector General of Police (Crime) Ahfad-ul-Mujtaba has been posted as Managing Director J&K Police Housing Corporation. Mukesh Singh, an IPS officer on Central deputation, has been posted as the new IGP Crime.A top police officer in Jammu and Kashmir, who was instrumental in securing the conviction of the accused in the Kathua gangrape and murder case, has been transferred a week before the convicts’ appeal comes up for hearing before the Punjab and Haryana High Court. Related News Advertising Written by Bashaarat Masood | Srinagar | Updated: July 10, 2019 2:25:56 pmcenter_img Inspector General of Police (Crime) Ahfad-ul-Mujtaba has been posted as Managing Director J&K Police Housing Corporation. Mukesh Singh, an IPS officer on Central deputation, has been posted as the new IGP Crime.Mujtaba’s transfer has raised eyebrows in official circles because the Crime Branch recently wrote to the government, recommending that the acquittal of one of the accused be challenged, and the appeal should seek enhancement of punishment of the other convicts.However, K Vijay Kumar, advisor to J&K Governor Satya Pal Malik, who holds the Home Department portfolio, said that the Kathua case has nothing to do with Mujtaba’s transfer. Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield “He has not been shifted. He has been given the choicest posting,” Kumar told The Indian Express. “There is no negative at all in this transfer. It is only very positive and we appreciate the good work (done by him).Kumar said that the recommendations of the Crime Branch are with the Home Department.On June 25, the Crime Branch wrote to J-K government’s Home department recommending appeal against the acquittal of one of the accused, enhancement of sentence against the convicts and proper legal defence against the convicts’ appeal in court. When the Home Department returned the file to the Crime Branch, it sent a second letter of request on July 5 and repeated for the sanction to challenge the acquittal.“The file (sent by the Crime Branch) is under process with the Home Department and it will be done,” he said. “Hundred per cent, it (Mujtaba’s transfer) has nothing to do with the (Kathua) case. Mukesh (Singh, the new IGP Crime) has experience in CBI and NIA and will definitely do a good job,” Kumar said. Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach Advertising After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan 1 Comment(s)last_img read more

Donald Trump asks Americans to stay true to our cause

first_img Cabinet asks finance panel to consider securing funds for defence Advertising Donald Trump asks Americans to 'stay true to our cause' US President Donald Trump. (Bloomberg)President Donald Trump celebrated “the greatest political journey in human history” in a Fourth of July commemoration before a soggy but cheering crowd of spectators, many of them invited, on the grounds of the Lincoln Memorial. Supporters welcomed his tribute to the US military while protesters assailed him for putting himself center stage on a holiday devoted to unity. Post Comment(s) By adding his own, one-hour “Salute to America” production to capital festivities that typically draw hundreds of thousands anyway, Trump became the first president in nearly seven decades to address a crowd at the National Mall on the Fourth of July.Protesters objecting to what they saw as his co-opting of the holiday inflated a roly-poly balloon depicting Trump as an angry, diaper-clad baby.Trump set aside a historic piece of real estate _ a stretch of the Mall from the Lincoln Monument to the midpoint of the reflecting pool _ for a mix of invited military members, Republican and Trump campaign donors and other bigwigs. It’s where Martin Luther King Jr. gave his “I have a dream” speech, Barack Obama and Trump held inaugural concerts and protesters swarmed into the water when supporters of Richard Nixon put on a July 4, 1970, celebration, with the president sending taped remarks from California.Aides to the crowd-obsessed Trump fretted about the prospect of empty seats at his event, said a person familiar with the planning who was not authorized to be identified. Aides scrambled in recent days to distribute tickets and mobilize the Trump and GOP social media accounts to encourage participation for an event hastily arranged and surrounded with confusion. Trump says ‘will take a look’ at accusations over Google, China After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Related News By AP |Washington | Published: July 5, 2019 7:30:56 am Trump altered the lineup by adding his speech, moving the fireworks closer to the Lincoln Memorial and summoning the tanks and warplanes. Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield US House votes to set aside impeachment resolution against Trump Taking stock of monsoon rain US mulls increasing merit-based immigration to 57% Back at the White House, Trump tweeted an aerial photo showing an audience that filled both sides of the memorial’s reflecting pool and stretched to the Washington Monument. “A great crowd of tremendous Patriots this evening, all the way back to the Washington Monument!” he said.Many who filed into the sprawling VIP section said they got their free tickets from members of Congress or from friends or neighbors who couldn’t use theirs. Outside that zone, a diverse mix of visitors, locals, veterans, tour groups, immigrant families and more milled about, some drawn by Trump, some by curiosity, some by the holiday’s regular activities along the Mall.Protesters earlier made their voices heard in sweltering heat by the Washington Monument, along the traditional parade route and elsewhere, while the VIP section at the reflecting pool served as something of a buffer for Trump’s event.In the shadow of the Washington Monument hours before Trump’s speech, the anti-war organization Codepink erected a 20-foot tall “Trump baby” balloon to protest what activists saw as his intrusion in Independence Day and a focus on military might that they associate with martial regimes. As rain fell on him, Trump called on Americans to “stay true to our cause” during a program that adhered to patriotic themes and hailed an eclectic mix of history’s heroes, from the armed forces, space, civil rights and other endeavors of American life.He largely stuck to his script, avoiding diversions into his agenda or re-election campaign. But in one exception, he vowed, “Very soon, we will plant the American flag on Mars,” actually a distant goal not likely to be achieved until late in the 2020s if even then.A late afternoon downpour drenched the capital’s Independence Day crowds and Trump’s speech unfolded in occasional rain. The warplanes and presidential aircraft he had summoned conducted their flyovers as planned, capped by the Navy Blue Angels aerobatics team. Best Of Express “We think that he is making this about himself and it’s really a campaign rally,” said Medea Benjamin, the organization’s co-director. “We think that he’s a big baby. … He’s erratic, he’s prone to tantrums, he doesn’t understand the consequences of his actions. And so this is a great symbol of how we feel about our president.”The balloon remained tied down at the Mall because park officials restricted the group’s permission to move it or fill it with helium, Benjamin said.Protesters also handed out small Trump-baby balloons on sticks. Molly King of La Porte, Indiana, a 13-year-old Trump supporter in sunglasses and a “Make America Great Again” hat, happily came away with one.“They’re making a big stink about it but it’s actually pretty cute,” she said. “I mean, why not love your president as you’d love a baby?”A small crowd gathered to take pictures with the big balloon, which drew Trump supporters and detractors.“Even though everybody has different opinions,” said Kevin Malton, a Trump supporter from Middlesboro, Kentucky, “everybody’s getting along.”But Daniela Guray, a 19-year-old from Chicago who held a “Dump Trump” sign, said she was subjected to a racial epithet while walking along the Constitution Avenue parade route and told to go home.She said she did not come to the Mall to protest but ended up doing so. “I started seeing all the tanks with all the protests and that’s when I said, `Wait, this is not an actual Fourth of July,”’ she said. “Trump is making it his day rather than the Fourth of July.”Trump had sounded a defensive note Wednesday, tweeting that the cost “will be very little compared to what it is worth.” But he glossed over a host of expenses associated with the display of military might, including flying in planes and tanks and other vehicles to Washington by rail.Not since 1951, when President Harry Truman spoke before a large gathering on the Washington Monument grounds to mark the 175th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, has a commander in chief made an Independence Day speech to a sizable crowd on the Mall.Pete Buttigieg, one of the Democrats running for president, said: “This business of diverting money and military assets to use them as a kind of prop, to prop up a presidential ego, is not reflecting well on our country.” Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, is a Navy Reserve veteran who served in Afghanistan in 2014.Two groups, the National Parks Conservation Foundation and Democracy Forward, want the Interior Department’s internal watchdog to investigate what they say may be a “potentially unlawful decision to divert” national parks money to Trump’s “spectacle.”Trump has longed for a public display of U.S. military prowess ever since he watched a two-hour procession of French military tanks and fighter jets in Paris on Bastille Day in July 2017.Washington has held an Independence Day celebration for decades, featuring a parade along Constitution Avenue, a concert on the Capitol lawn with music by the National Symphony Orchestra and fireworks beginning at dusk near the Washington Monument. 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These orangutan moms scratch to get their kids attention

first_img By Kelly MayesJul. 16, 2019 , 7:01 PM These orangutan moms scratch to get their kid’s attention Email SUAQ/Caroline Schuppli Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country It is not uncommon to see Sumatran orangutans scratching, but now, it appears these primates may be doing more than satisfying an itch. A new study shows loud scratching sounds from Sumatran orangutan mothers serve as a call to their young.Researchers observed 17 individuals—four mothers and their offspring—in their natural habitat, Gunung Leuser National Park in Aceh in Indonesia. They recorded the behavior of the different mothers and their young before, during, and after the mother made a loud scratching sound by itching the leathery skin on their head, limbs, or body. In most cases the mothers looked at their offspring while scratching, and afterward the two would leave the area together, the team reports today in Biology Letters. After documenting this action nearly 1500 times, the researchers came to believe it was the mother’s way of telling the child it was time to leave.Female orangutans usually communicate with their offspring through silent gestures to avoid attracting predators. This makes the loud scratching noise even more unusual, the team says. The scientists suggest the orangutans use the scratching sound because it is loud enough and urgent enough to get the child’s attention without being so loud as to alert predators. The researchers say more studies are needed to fully understand whether orangutans evolved to communicate this way, or whether this signal is specific to just this group of orangutans.last_img read more

Researchers awarded 10 million grant to address root causes of asthma in

first_img Source:https://www.nationaljewish.org/about/news/press-releases/2018/researchers-to-study-drivers-of-asthma-in-puerto-rico Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 16 2018Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), National Jewish Health and Centro de Neumología Pediátrica in Puerto Rico have been awarded nearly $10 million as part of a 5-year grant from the U.S. National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), to address the root causes of asthma by studying 4,000 children in Puerto Rico, where asthma prevalence and deaths are among the highest in the world. The team plans to follow the children from birth through early childhood to study how genes and viral infections affect respiratory disease.The new study, named the Puerto Rican Infant Metagenomic and Epidemiologic study of Respiratory Outcomes (PRIMERO), will be one of the largest U.S. birth cohort studies ever conducted in a minority population. A birth cohort is a special type of study in which newborn infants are enrolled and followed through childhood and potentially beyond to monitor exposures in early life and the onset of illnesses. Because the rate of asthma is so high in Puerto Rico, it is expected that many children will develop asthma, providing useful information to researchers to understand the causes.”Creating a birth cohort is an extremely rare opportunity and uniquely positions us to answer fundamental questions about the early-life origins of asthma,” said co-principal investigator Esteban G. Burchard, MD, MPH, of UCSF. “As a clinician, predicting development of asthma has been a challenge,” said José Rodríguez-Santana, MD, FAAP, FCCP, of Centro de Neumología Pediátrica in San Juan, Puerto Rico, also a co-principal investigator. “PRIMERO will help us discover why one infant can get very sick with a viral infection and develop asthma while another baby with the same viral infection has only minimal symptoms and does not develop asthma.”Burchard and Rodríguez-Santana have collaborated for 20 years studying the genetics of asthma in Latin Americans. The new grant brings in researcher Max Seibold, PhD, of National Jewish Health, who has developed novel genetic techniques and strategies to easily obtain and analyze genetic samples from children’s airways.Related StoriesStudy examines differences in genetic risk factors for childhood-onset and adult-onset asthmaStudy provides new insight into development of asthmaGrowing up on farm with animals may half risk of asthma and allergies, suggests study”Our prospective design and the genetic techniques we have pioneered will allow us to identify biological drivers of disease and biomarkers that may predict outcomes well before they are traditionally diagnosed,” said Seibold.”These discoveries can inform development of therapeutics for early intervention and prevention of disease.” The current grant provides funds to recruit 4,000 pregnant Puerto Rican women and 4,000 of their newborn infants over the next two years and track these infants’ respiratory health for five years.”This will make PRIMERO the first study to investigate how the airway develops in healthy and diseased states, from birth to childhood,” said Sam Oh, PhD, MPH, director of epidemiology in the UCSF Asthma Collaboratory, who is leading oversight of the PRIMERO study design and logistics. “We hope that it will lead to new insights about how to reduce the asthma endemic to Puerto Rico.” “With buy-in from their families, we hope to extend this study to follow these children for decades, chronicling their exposures and health outcomes in real time,” Oh added. “Of course, that would depend on continued funding through the NIH or other sources such as philanthropy.”The team also hopes that additional funding will enable them to go beyond collecting airway cells from PRIMERO infants to also collect multiple tissue samples, including stem cells, urine, stool, and placenta tissue, and to curate these samples in a large biobank as a unique resource to study the factors affecting the health of PRIMERO participants throughout their lives.last_img read more

Early postpartum initiation of opioids associated with persistent use

Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Dec 18 2018Vanderbilt researchers have published findings indicating that regardless of whether a woman delivers a child by cesarean section or by vaginal birth, if they fill prescriptions for opioid pain medications early in the postpartum period, they are at increased risk of developing persistent opioid use.In a research letter published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the authors examined the data of 102,541 women who gave birth while covered by Tennessee Medicaid (TennCare) to analyze their use of opioid pain relievers during the postpartum period. The study population was opioid naïve, meaning they had not used opioids in the 180 days before the delivery.”Studying postpartum women gives us an excellent opportunity to compare two demographically similar populations of women with a common experience of childbirth, one discharged with opioid prescriptions routinely (cesarean birth), and one not discharged with opioid prescriptions routinely (vaginal birth),” said Sarah Osmundson, MD, assistant professor of Maternal-Fetal Medicine in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the study’s lead author.Of the mothers included, 89 percent of the women who had a cesarean delivery and 53 percent with a vaginal delivery filled opioid prescriptions during the postpartum period. The incidence of persistent opioid use during the year following delivery was low overall — at less than 1 percent — and was higher among women with cesarean versus vaginal delivery. However, among women who filled an initial opioid prescription, the risk of persistent opioid use was similar between the delivery groups. Furthermore, filling additional prescriptions for opioids in the postpartum period substantially and consistently increased this risk in both groups.Because childbirth is so common, when the findings were projected to the number of women who give birth annually in the United States, the researchers estimated that unless postpartum opioid prescribing practices are modified, an alarming number of women who give birth annually could be at risk of becoming chronic opioid users.Related StoriesUS dentists write more opioid prescriptions than England dentistsPatients taking opioids for chronic pain could face health care access problemsPDFNJ campaign emphasizes the hazards of prescription opioids”This study is one of the firsts to indicate that regardless of the delivery type, postpartum initiation of opioid use — a modifiable practice — is associated with persistent opioid use,” said study senior author Carlos Grijalva, MD, MPH, associate professor of Health Policy. “If our estimates were projected to the number of women who give birth annually in the United States, we calculated that every year there would be around 21,000 women becoming chronic opioid users that would be attributable to opioid use in the postpartum period.””Opioid prescribing can have a huge impact in this population given that 86 percent of women will have at least one delivery and may be exposed to opioids, and that almost one-third of women undergoing childbirth in the United States will have a cesarean. Policies designed to standardize and improve opioid prescribing have the potential to influence exposures for a large proportion of our population,” Osmundson said.Based on their findings, the researchers are calling on obstetricians to exercise caution when prescribing potentially addictive pain medicine following childbirth and to consider alternative pain management measures.They hope additional research in this area will influence other medical specialties’ prescribing practices as well.”We are now doing additional studies of the characteristics of the first prescription and the patient factors that influence chronic opioid use,” Osmundson said. “Hopefully, this work will also provoke opioid prescribers in other fields — surgical and non-surgical — to consider the long-term implication of opioid prescribing and seek novel, safe and effective approaches to managing pain.” Source:http://news.vumc.org/2018/12/13/early-postpartum-opioids-linked-with-persistent-usage/ read more

Scientists find highly promising therapeutic target for leukemia

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 13 2019Cancer cells consume sugar at a higher rate than healthy cells, but they’re also hungry for amino acids, the building blocks of proteins and other biomolecules. Researchers at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University have discovered a way to exploit that hunger to selectively block the growth of leukemias.The results were published online Monday, March 11 in Nature Metabolism.Scientists led by Cheng-Kui Qu, MD, PhD, have identified a transporter enzyme called ASCT2, which brings amino acids into cells, as a target for anticancer drugs. Deleting the gene encoding this enzyme prolongs survival of mice with an aggressive form of leukemia (AML/acute myeloid leukemia): from 45 days to more than 300 days.Related StoriesStudy identifies patterns of chronic lymphocytic leukemia growthImmune system errors linked to development of childhood leukemiaNew Australian drug trial achieves remarkable results in patients with acute myeloid leukemia”So far, little progress has been made in finding therapeutic targets in amino acid metabolic pathways that can be harnessed to kill cancer cells but spare normal cells,” Qu says. “This is a highly promising therapeutic target for leukemia. ASCT2 is dispensable for normal blood cell development, but it is required for leukemia development and progression.”Qu is professor of pediatrics at Emory University School of Medicine, Winship Cancer Institute and Aflac Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. The first author of the paper is postdoctoral fellow Fang Ni, MD, PhD.Recent years have seen a resurgence of interest in the Warburg effect: the warped metabolism of cancer cells. The idea is to starve tumor cells, while leaving healthy cells alone.ASCT2 is responsible for taking up several amino acids, such as glutamine, into cells. In leukemia cells, loss of ASCT2 generates a global effect on cellular metabolism, disrupts leucine influx and mTOR signaling, and induces apoptosis.Qu says his team was surprised to find that the gene encoding ASCT2 can be deleted from mice, without substantially disrupting blood cell development. However, the mice do take longer to recover white blood cell counts after the stress of chemotherapy drugs or radiation.”Although our overall findings strongly suggest ASCT2 as a therapeutic target for leukemia treatment, researchers will need to exercise caution in combining ASCT2 inhibitors with chemotherapy in clinical trials,” Qu says.Qu’s team did test inhibiting ASCT2 in mice grafted with human AML, and found a significant therapeutic effect, but he says that the drug they used was low in potency and not specific enough for clinical use. Already, other researchers have reported the identification of a specific inhibitor for ASCT2, with activity against other types of cancer as well. Source:http://news.emory.edu/stories/2019/03/qu_aminoacids_leukemia/last_img read more

Study provides first evidence of crosstalk between the heart and fat cells

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)May 10 2019Like sending a letter through the mail or a text over a cellular network, the heart can generate messages that travel long distances through the body. Those messages ultimately reach fat cells, new research by scientists at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University (LKSOM) shows.”The ability of the heart to communicate directly with fat had been suspected, but our study is the first to provide evidence of crosstalk between heart and fat tissue that is regulated by the enzyme, G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2),” said senior investigator Walter J. Koch, PhD, W.W. Smith Endowed Chair in Cardiovascular Medicine, Professor and Chair of the Department of Pharmacology, and Director of the Center for Translational Medicine at LKSOM.The findings could have implications for modulating weight gain in patients with heart failure, a condition that arises when the heart can no longer effectively pump blood through the body.In the breakthrough paper, published online in the journal JCI Insight, Dr. Koch and colleagues show that the heart relies on a cardiac-specific messenger, the signaling enzyme, GRK2, to relay information about metabolism to fat cells.Related StoriesTeam approach to care increases likelihood of surviving refractory cardiogenic shockStudy explores role of iron in over 900 diseasesRNA-binding protein SRSF3 appears to be key factor for proper heart contraction, survival”GRK2 signaling in the heart effectively regulates fat accumulation in the body,” said Dr. Koch. “Through this pathway, the heart ‘talks’ to fat and alters how fat responds to certain conditions.” In previous work, Dr. Koch’s laboratory showed that GRK2 serves essential roles in both normal heart function and heart failure.The researchers carried out their investigation in mice with GRK2 activity inhibited in the heart. When fed a high fat diet, GRK2-inhibited mice accumulated significantly more fat than their littermates with normal GRK2 expression. The experiment was repeated in mice with GRK2 overexpressed in the heart, mimicking the increase in GRK2 that occurs in heart failure in humans. When given a high fat diet, these mice gained less body weight compared to their normal littermates.Using complex metabolomics, a way of investigating metabolites associated with cellular processes, Dr. Koch’s team found that GRK2 signaling specifically altered branched chain amino acid (BCAA) and endocannabinoid metabolism in the heart. GRK2-overexpressing mice on high fat diets had metabolite profiles that were distinct from those of GRK2-inhibited mice and normal animals.”We also took the work a step further and identified one BCAA metabolite that enhanced fat cell differentiation in vitro,” Dr. Koch said. His team plans next to look for other metabolites and protein factors that are involved in crosstalk between the heart and fat tissue.The new study was made possible thanks to a prestigious $1 million Merit Award from the American Heart Association given to Dr. Koch in 2018 to investigate molecular signaling by the heart. “The Merit Award provided the funding we needed to explore the possibility that the heart acts as an endocrine organ, secreting substances that regulate distant tissues and organs,” he said.Source: https://www.templehealth.org/last_img read more

Partial breast irradiation effective alternative for treatment of lowrisk breast cancer patients

first_imgA significant portion of the breast cancer patient population nationally – about 25,000 to 30,000 women — would qualify for partial breast irradiation. This is tremendously important because it allows us to give women the right amount of treatment for her disease, and potentially allowing better access to effective breast conservation for those who live far from a radiation facility. Partial breast irradiation can also be delivered in five consecutive days versus whole breast, which can involve four to six consecutive weeks of multi-day treatment. There is no denying that the five day treatment is less costly and disruptive to life.” At the OSUCCC – James, breast radiation is also delivered in the face down (prone) position to reduce radiation exposure in the chest wall, which has been linked to increased risk of heart and lung disease post cancer treatment. Source:The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Centercenter_img Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)May 17 2019Partial breast irradiation produces similar long-term survival rates and risk for recurrence compared with whole breast irradiation for many women with low-risk, early stage breast cancer, according to new clinical data from a national clinical trial involving researchers from The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James).This randomized, phase 3 study compared whole breast irradiation with partial breast irradiation in a large group of women with stage 0, 1 or 2 breast cancer. More than 4,200 patients were enrolled in the trial as part of NRG Oncology cooperative group clinical trial.Study results showed that while partial breast irradiation does not produce equivalent cancer control for all breast cancer patients with stage 0, 1 and 2 disease, it should still be considered as an alternative for women with DCIS (ductal carcinoma in situ) and early stage breast cancers deemed “low risk,” based on other tumor characteristics.When looking at the entire study population, women who received partial breast irradiation experienced a 4.6 percent recurrence rate. Those who underwent whole breast irradiation experienced at 3.9 percent rate of recurrence. Toxicity from treatment was similar, as well as the risk for secondary cancers.However, researchers also looked at how this played out in subsegments of the population and found that rates of recurrence were nearly identical for women with DCIS, regardless of whether they received whole or partial breast irradiation. This was also true for women with breast cancer classified as low-risk, based on the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) clinical guidelines.Related StoriesSpecial blood test may predict relapse risk for breast cancer patientsTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerResearchers showed that in this subsegment of breast cancer patients, the likelihood of recurrence 10-years post treatment was very low overall and almost identical between women who received whole breast irradiation (2.3 percent) and partial breast irradiation (2.7 percent).Julia White, MD, co-principal investigator of the national trial and head of breast radiation oncology at the OSUCCC – James says this is very important because it reduces the burden of care for women who can still achieve cancer control with fewer treatments, over a shorter period of time.last_img read more