Amazons growing pains in Seattle offer lessons to new hosts

first_imgSEATTLE — As Amazon turns its attention to setting up new homes in Long Island City, New York and Arlington, Virginia, experts and historians in Seattle say both places can expect a delicate relationship with the world’s hottest online retailer.The communities will be subject to outsized influence from a company used to getting what it wants and unfazed by blame, fairly or not, for widespread changes all around.Just look to the Pacific Northwest, where both Amazon and Seattle have transformed dramatically together and sometimes at odds over the past 24 years, prompting resentment among a certain crowd of “mossback” natives.Amazon’s workforce in the city has grown from 5,000 to 45,000 employees since 2010, while its physical footprint in the downtown core has expanded from 1 million to 8 million square feet today.Sally Ho, The Associated Presslast_img read more

Fascinating GymnastLike Spiders Discovered in Moroccan Desert

Casablanca- A fascinating new species of spider, the Cebrennus rechenbergi, which move by performing flic-flac jumps (2m/sec), was recently discovered in the Moroccan desert.Recently discovered in Morocco’s southeastern desert, this spider is as agile as a gymnast.  “Like a gymnast,” writes the New York Times, “it runs for a short time, then stretches out its front legs, spinning into the air and returning to touch the ground with its hind legs.”According to the website Sci-News, the newly discovered spider has been named after the German botanical expert Dr. Ingo Rechenberg from the Technical University in Berlin. Rechenberg collected live specimens of Cebrennus rechenbergi during an expedition in Morocco. However, the “Moroccan flic-flac spider” has been chosen as a common name for the unique species.“Like a gymnast, it propels itself off the ground, followed by a series of rapid flic-flac movements of its legs,” Sci-News quotes Dr. Peter Jäger from the Senckenberg Research Institute.More fascinating is the Cebrennus rechenbergi’s tube-like, sandydwelling—surely one of the wonders of insect architecture.“I picked it up by hand — I wasn’t scared,” Dr. Rechenberg told the NY Times.© Morocco World News. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, rewritten or redistributed read more

Arizona utility finally comes clean about political spending

PHOENIX — Facing what it saw as a threat to its monopoly from a surging rooftop solar industry, Arizona’s largest utility secretly funneled millions of dollars to back favoured candidates for the state commission regulating it.Arizona Public Service Co. recently acknowledged it gave money to groups that spent $3.2 million in the 2014 Arizona Corporation Commission races. The disclosure in filings with the commission came after the utility refused for the past four years to confirm or deny its participation in the election despite broad suspicion that it did.The spending raises questions about whether a regulated monopoly such as APS should be allowed to contribute money to political causes that could adversely affect customers, and whether it should be permitted to keep such spending secret.“They are still taking ratepayer money and using it against the ratepayers to jack up their rates,” said Tom Ryan, an attorney in metro Phoenix who has been a critic of some commission members.The 2014 move by APS and its owner, Pinnacle West Capital Corp., was a break from a decades-long practice by the state’s utilities of not meddling in political races involving their regulators. The utility spent on elections again in 2016 and 2018 but publicly disclosed it.The shift led to years of negative press, along with an FBI investigation that continues to this day.Pinnacle West and APS CEO Don Brandt was involved in deflecting news reports as the company funneled a combined $12.8 million to 15 political groups in 2014, including the $3.2 million that was spent in commission races.The utility finally disclosed the spending late last month after a Democrat who took office in January joined with other commissioners to demand records.It also provided details of $4.1 million in spending to influence its regulators’ 2016 election and nearly $40 million to defeat a citizens’ initiative last year that would have required that it get much more of its power from solar and other renewable sources. APS previously acknowledged those contributions.“That was a policy issue with direct impact on our customers and our business and on Arizona,” Jenna Rowell, the utility’s director of external relations, said of the 2018 spending. “So we got involved in that early, we were up front about that. In addition to all of the required disclosures, we talked frequently and openly about why we were getting involved against that effort.”Brandt was getting updates from executives overseeing the company’s political efforts in the 2014 and 2016 elections, according to documents provided to the commission.Company officials haven’t made Brandt available for interviews. Rowell pointed to a 2014 letter from the company’s then-chief operating officer when asked why it dumped its long-held policy of not engaging in political races for its regulators.“As you undoubtedly are aware, the political landscape is changing,” now-retired COO Mark Schiavoni wrote to two commission candidates who inquired about the utility’s 2014 political spending. “Because of the tactics a number of organizations are employing to misrepresent important regulatory issues, we may need to respond in the future to set the record straight on issues of importance to Arizona, our customers and our company.”One group that received funding from the utility also spent $704,000 in the 2014 secretary of state’s race, including giving $437,000 to support Republican candidate Justin Pierce, the son of then-outgoing Commissioner Gary Pierce.The FBI and U.S. Attorney’s Office launched an investigation tied to the spending, and Pinnacle West was forced to confirm in its filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission that it has received grand jury subpoenas for information “pertaining to the 2014 statewide election races in Arizona for Secretary of State and for positions on the ACC (Arizona Corporation Commission).”The FBI confirmed to The Associated Press that its investigation into political spending in certain 2014 statewide races remains ongoing, though it declined to provide details. The U.S. Attorney’s Office declined to say whether a grand jury was still examining the 2014 spending.Neither APS nor the FBI has disclosed which possible violations of law are being investigated.Pinnacle West insists no ratepayer money was spent on its political efforts, but former Commissioner Bill Mundell said the claim was disingenuous, given that the company gets nearly all its money from utility customers.The 2014 effort came as APS was faced with a growing rooftop solar industry and consumers’ embrace of solar panels that could cut their power use — and the utility’s profits. APS wanted commissioners to lower the amount it had to pay for power rooftop solar customers sent back to its utility grid. The commission ultimately did lower that payout for future solar installations.Vernon Parker, who lost his 2014 commission race, said he drew APS’ ire by going to a pro-solar gathering where he gathered campaign petition signatures.“The bizarre thing is that I would have been fair,” Parker said. “Any issue that would have been raised, I would have asked, ‘What does this mean to our ratepayers?’”Commissioner Andy Tobin, who was backed by the utility in his 2016 race even though he said he discouraged it, said APS should have been up front about its 2014 spending and explained its belief that the solar industry posed a threat to its business.“That’s what they should have done, and I don’t know why they didn’t,” Tobin said.___Follow Jacques Billeaud at twitter.com/jacquesbilleaud.Bob Christie And Jacques Billeaud, The Associated Press read more

Feds deny leases for Minnesota mine company to press ahead

MINNEAPOLIS – Two longstanding mineral rights leases that are critical for a proposed large underground copper-nickel mine upstream from the pristine Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness in northeastern Minnesota will not be renewed, two federal agencies announced Thursday, but the company said it will press forward.The decision by the Interior and Agriculture departments strikes a serious blow to the proposed $2.8 billion Twin Metals project near Ely, about 250 miles north of Minneapolis. The agencies also announced other steps to protect the Boundary Waters watershed from future mining projects.However, the incoming administration of President-elect Donald Trump potentially could reverse the decision. Trump’s nominee for interior secretary, Rep. Ryan Zinke of Montana, has advocated for increased mining on federal lands.In a statement, the agencies cited “broad concerns from thousands of public comments and input about potential impacts of mining on the wilderness area’s watershed, fish and wildlife, and the nearly $45 million recreation economy.”Twin Metals Minnesota, which sued the federal government in September to force renewal of its leases, said it will continue pursuing its legal options. The lawsuit remains pending. The company issued a statement saying that if the decision stands, it “will have a devastating impact on the future economy of the Iron Range and all of Northeast Minnesota, eliminating the promise of thousands of good-paying jobs and billions of dollars in investment in the region.”But environmental groups that had fought the project for years welcomed the announcement.Becky Rom, national chair of the Campaign to Save the Boundary Waters, said she believes the project is dead, and that it would be legally difficult for the Trump administration to undo the decision, but vowed that opponents will keep up the fight.“We’re going to continue to make our case to policymakers and the American public to raise awareness of this issue,” she said. “By no means is our work done.”But Frank Ongaro, executive director of the trade group Mining Minnesota, called the decision “a perfect example of why Democrats lost rural America.” It will chase investment away from the U.S. and make the country more dependent on foreign governments for metals, he said. He expressed hope that the Trump administration will revisit the decision.Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said the agencies plan to take a two-year “time out” to conduct a careful environmental analysis and engage the public on whether future mining should be authorized on any federal land adjacent to the Boundary Waters. His agency runs the Forest Service, which manages the wilderness area and nearby federal lands where Twin Metals wants to mine.Interior Secretary Sally Jewell noted that the Boundary Waters is the most visited federally designated wilderness area in the U.S., with 150,000 visitors annually. Her department runs the Bureau of Land Management, which controls the leases.If the “time out” goes forward under the new administration, no new mineral exploration or development applications would be accepted for lands within the Boundary Waters watershed while the agencies conduct an environmental analysis to determine if the lands should be withdrawn for 20 years. A permanent withdrawal would require congressional approval.The leases were first issued in 1966 and last renewed in 2004. They would have allowed the company to mine copper, nickel and platinum-palladium-gold group metals southeast of Ely. Environmentalists objected because the metals are bound up in sulfide-bearing minerals that can leach sulfuric acid and other pollutants when exposed to air and water. The agencies said acid mine drainage would pose a significant risk to the Boundary Waters.But Twin Metals, which is owned by the Chilean mining group Antofagasta, said it can mine without damaging the wilderness while creating generations of badly needed jobs in an economically struggling region of the state.Thursday’s decision does not affect a copper-nickel mining project several miles to the southwest called PolyMet, which sits in a different watershed that eventually flows into Lake Superior. PolyMet, which is partly owned by Swiss commodities giant Glencore, is further along in the process. It has successfully completed its environmental review and is now applying for the necessary permits. The groups that oppose Twin Metals have also fought PolyMet. by Steve Karnowski, The Associated Press Posted Dec 15, 2016 9:47 am MDT Last Updated Dec 15, 2016 at 6:08 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email Feds deny leases for Minnesota mine; company to press ahead read more

Egypt UN chief and Security Council condemn attack on Sinai mosque

“The Secretary-General extends his deepest condolences to the families of the victims and to the Government and people of Egypt and wishes a swift recovery to those who have been injured,” his spokesperson, Farhan Haq, said in a statement. “The Secretary-General calls for those responsible for today’s horrific attack to be swiftly brought to justice,” he added.In a statement issued to the press by Ambassador Sebastiano Cardi of Italy, which holds the presidency of the Security Council for November, the 15-member body also strongly condemned the “heinous and cowardly terrorist attack” which reportedly left at least 235 people dead and over 100 injured. Council members reaffirmed that terrorism in all its forms and manifestations constitutes one of the most serious threats to international peace and security, and underlined the need to bring perpetrators, organizers, financiers and sponsors of these “reprehensible acts of terrorism” to justice. read more

Meet Mr Brock John Zoccoli named Distinguished Alumnus

John Zoccoli has been named the 2013 Distinguished Alumni Award recipient by Brock’s Alumni Association. He’ll receive his award during Homecoming, which happens Sept. 19-22.Alumnus John Zoccoli loves Brock.This fall, the University will show the feeling is mutual when it presents Zoccoli with the 2013 Distinguished Alumni Award on Sept. 21 at Homecoming in front of a crowd of alumni, family and friends. The award, the most prestigious presented by the Alumni Association, is presented annually to a graduate for their professional achievements, community service and prominence, and is seen as an inspiration to Brock students.“(I’m) so thankful. I’m humbled, I’m honoured,” said Zoccoli, who graduated in 1986 with his honours bachelor of administration degree. “I’m trying to find the right words. To have a longstanding relationship with the University, and now this, is so humbling. There are times I wonder if I deserve it.”A rundown of Zoccoli’s involvement with Brock since graduating – particularly since 2002 when he joined the family business of operating nine Niagara Tim Hortons outlets – reads like a love letter to the University.He has been a guest speaker in classes at the Goodman School of Business, given a convocation address to Faculty of Business graduates and served as honorary president for the Business Students’ Association, which hosts academic competitions and conferences.Zoccoli also co-chaired his co-op accounting class’s 25th anniversary reunion committee and helped establish an endowment fund for future students. He sits on the Dean’s Advisory Council, has been inducted as chapter honouree of Brock’s Beta Gamma Sigma International Honours Society and regularly supports many of the charity golf tournaments the University hosts.In 2008, he was awarded the Brock University Faculty of Business Distinguished Graduate award.He has also been involved with several community organizations, including the Niagara Foundation for Family and Children’s Services, the United Way, Niagara District Chartered Accountants Association and St. Catharines Jaycees.“Whenever the University needs support, John is the first one to offer his help,” said Don Cyr, Goodman School of Business Dean. “He has financially supported numerous Brock initiatives… but his support doesn’t end with monetary gifts, which over the years has been substantial. John has been a valuable member of the Dean’s Advisory Council (and he’s) always the first to sign up for a committee or offer support where needed.”Ask Zoccoli, though, and he’s the one who feels indebted to Brock.As a student in one of the first classes of Brock’s accounting co-op program, Zoccoli, who grew up in Niagara, recalled the program quickly garnered a reputation that other institutes work decades to achieve. He knew shortly after he started attending the University that he made the right decision.“I have nothing but wonderful things to say about it and how well it prepared me for my Chartered Accountant exams,” he said. (Zoccoli went on to score the highest mark in Niagara on the exam that earned him his Chartered Accountant designation).Even nearly 30 years after graduating, there aren’t two weeks that go by that he isn’t involved with something happening on the Brock campus, be it with the Goodman School or attending a performance or sporting event with his family. His wife Michelle calls him Mr. Brock.It’s a moniker he’ll happily continue to have as eldest son Adam is about to start his second year at Brock in health sciences, and his other son, Andrew, plans to study marketing at Brock (“sadly, not accounting,” Zoccoli noted). Daughter Janyn, in Grade 10, is showing signs of following in her father’s number-crunching footsteps.“I’m just normal old John who, 10 years from now, is still going to be singing the praises of Brock University. I really can’t believe it. It makes me feel warm inside that Brock thinks so highly of me.”Register for tickets to the Distinguished Alumni Award Luncheon read more

Darren Sharpers Rape Charges Extend to New Orleans

Could it be that Darren Sharper, the charismatic former NFL safety, was a serial rapist? As bizarre as that might seem, law enforcement officials around the country are painting an ugly picture of the former Pro Bowl player.NBC News reported that Sharper turned himself in to police late Thursday night in Los Angeles, after a warrant was issued for his arrest earlier in the day in New Orleans.An acquaintance of Sharper’s, Erik Nunez, also is facing two charges of aggravated rape in the incident, which police in Louisiana said occurred at an apartment on Sept. 23, 2013. Nunez was booked on two counts of rape Friday morning in New Orleans.Earlier this month, Sharper was charged with seven felonies in Los Angeles related to cases in which he is accused of drugging and raping two women he met at nightclubs. He pleaded not guilty to those charges.Sharper also is under investigation in sexual assault cases in Florida, Nevada and Arizona.If convicted in California, Sharper could face more than 30 years in state prison. If convicted of aggravated rape in Louisiana, both Sharper, 38, and Nunez, 26, would face life imprisonment.Sharper was selected All-Pro six times and chosen for the Pro Bowl five times. He played in two Super Bowls, one with the Green Bay Packers as a rookie and a second with the New Orleans Saints. He retired after the 2010 season, having played 14 years in the NFL, and is an analyst for NFL Network, which has suspended him indefinitely without pay. read more

Prince Charles to make star turn on Gardeners World asking viewers to

The gardens at Highgrove Earlier this year, the Royal Horticultural Society and Defra called on holidaymakers to stop bringing plants back from their foreign holidays, warning it could bring pests and diseases to their gardens.Speaking on a topic close to his heart, the Prince has previously appeared on Countryfile and Gardeners’ Question Time, as well as guest editing Country Life magazine.Last year, he wrote of his personal battles to save the trees: “I have always been mortified by the loss of mature elm trees from almost every part of the countryside I knew and loved as a child, so I had high hopes for an American variety that appeared to be resistant to the disease. Gardeners' World favourite Monty Don The Prince Of Wales at Sandringham Flower ShowCredit:Getty The Prince has spent nearly 40 years transforming the gardens at Highgrove from overgrown and neglected land.He will tell Gardeners’ World viewers about the steps he is taking within the Duchy of Cornwall, which covers 53,000 hectares of land across 23 British counties to avoid the spread of plant diseases and pests.He will also talk about his first-hand experience of diseases such as Dutch Elm Disease, Ash Dieback and Phytophthora Ramorum from his management of the estate.The Prince is understood to have been particularly inspired by a visit to the border force at Heathrow earlier this year, where he learned more about how experts are preventing plant-borne diseases being brought into the country. The gardens at HighgroveCredit:Getty Prince Charles shares a love of trees with his mother, the QueenCredit:BBC The Prince Of Wales at Sandringham Flower Show The programme edit, including the section of the Prince’s discussion to be broadcast, has not yet been finalised.In the show’s introduction, Frost will say: “Back in February I was invited to a meeting at Highgrove with members from across the horticultural industry to discuss the problem of pests and diseases and what could be done about them.”One of the outcomes was Action Oak – a campaign launched at the Chelsea Flower show to help protect our iconic oak.”It is made up of charities, environmental organisations and land owners who are using their combined knowledge to safeguard the beautiful trees.”Today the Prince has invited me back to Highgrove to explain why we as gardeners also need to do our bit.” Prince Charles shares a love of trees with his mother, the Queen Gardeners’ World favourite Monty Don “I planted an avenue of them at Highgrove and then watched, miserably, as many of them succumbed just like the native variety.”Lamenting the devastation caused by Dutch Elm Disease, he added: “The wider problem is that a great many more pests and diseases are now seriously threatening the health of all our native trees, yet public awareness of this situation seems to be frighteningly low.”The episode of Gardeners’ World will air on BBC Two at 8pm on July 18. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The Prince of Wales is to make a star appearance on Gardeners’ World, imploring British garden lovers to “do their bit” to save native trees.The Prince, a long-term advocate of the natural world, will invite viewers into his gardens at Highgrove to investigate the twin blight of pests and diseases on the UK’s landscape.Telling viewers about his own love of gardening, and how he was introduced to his lifelong passion as a boy, he will echo the advice of experts in asking viewers to take measures to protect their own plots.Imploring them to ensure they get their plants from a reputable place, he is expected to ask amateur gardeners not to bring plants back from their own foreign holidays, to prevent introducing new disease.–– ADVERTISEMENT ––The Prince, a keen gardener, will be interviewed at Highgrove by presenter Adam Frost for an special episode focusing on trees. read more

PICS Cars stranded after icy conditions on the Sally Gap vandalised

first_imgA NUMBER OF vehicles that had to be abandoned on the the Sally Gap due to snow and ice over the weekend have been vandalised.Two cars were found on Monday with their windows smashed, seats ripped and batteries removed.Over 100 people were rescued from the mountainous areas in Wicklow, especially around the Sally Gap, over the weekend and 20 cars had to be abandoned as the road conditions were too dangerous to drive.Brendan Beirne from the Glen of Imaal of Mountain Rescue Team initially found the cars vandalised on Monday and said there could have been more cars damaged further up the mountain, but conditions were still too dangerous at that point to venture that far up. He says cars being vandalised on the Sally Gap is “a regular occurrence”.Here are what the stranded cars looked like:last_img read more

Teens rise early for robotics challenge giving disc golf a fling

first_imgFor about 700 robot enthusiasts, Saturday’s 7:30 a.m. unveiling was a little bit like Christmas morning … with a dose of dread.The session at Evergreen High School was part of unwrapping an annual robotics challenge. It started when this year’s competition was revealed in an international simulcast.“I’ve been waiting for this since last season ended,” said Josh Pigman, a member of the Evergreen school district’s “Green Wrenches” team.“I love building stuff,” Pigman said as more than 20 teammates brainstormed after the kickoff.The robotics program is a way to put what he’s been learning toward a hands-on project, he said.But an hour or so earlier, as details of the challenge were being revealed, the Mountain View junior started to think: “This will be insane.”A three-word phrase started going through Pigman’s mind: “Don’t throw Frisbees! Don’t throw Frisbees! Don’t throw Frisbees!”And this year’s challenge, of course, is a ‘bot-based version of disc golf. The teams will have six weeks to design and build their robots before the March 8-9 regional competition in Portland’s Memorial Coliseum.“This is a lot more difficult than last year,” when the challenge was a version of robot basketball, said Austin Lutz, a junior at Union High.last_img read more

Gautam Gambhir richest candidate in Delhi elections 10 times richer than boxer

first_imgGautam Gambhir is the richest candidate contesting in DelhiIANSCricketer-turned-politician Gautam Gambhir is officially the richest candidate contesting the Lok Sabha elections in Delhi. The 37-year-old BJP leader declared assets worth Rs 147 crore while filing his nominations for East Delhi constituency on Tuesday.Gambhir had joined BJP last month in the presence of Union Finance Minister Arun Jaitley. He will be contesting against Aam Aadmi Party’s Atishi Marlena and Arvinder Singh Lovely from Congress.Gambhir’s Income Tax Return reveals that he earned Rs 12.40 crore in 2017-2018 while his wife Natasha declared her income from 2017-2018 as Rs 6.15 lakh. He owns five cars and a two-wheeler.The next richest candidate in Delhi is Congress’s Mahabal Mishra who will be standing from West Delhi. He declared his assets at Rs 45 crore. According to Hindustan Times, his assets increased by an additional Rs 12 crore since the 2014 general elections.The third richest is boxer Vijender Singh contesting for Congress from South Delhi. His assets are worth Rs 12.14 crore. He was recently inducted into the party. Singh came into the limelight after winning a bronze medal at the 2008 Beijing Olympics.The total assets of former Delhi Chief Minister Sheila Dikshit, who filed her nomination from North-east Delhi, is Rs 4.92 crore. She declared her taxable income in 2017-2018 at Rs 15 crore. Other candidates include Congress’s Rajesh Lilothia with an income of Rs 26.34 lakh and MLA Ramesh Bidhuri with assets worth to Rs 18 crore.last_img read more

Bring all parties to next elections civil society members ask EC

first_imgMembers of civil society speak at a dialogue organised by the election commission at EC secretariat in the capital on Monday. Photo: Sazid HossainMembers of civil society on Monday asked the election commission to earn public confidence and take necessary measures to bring all political parties to the general elections slated for early 2019.Speaking at a dialogue organised by the election commission at its secretariat in Agargaon of the capital, the civil society members further said the commission should ensure scope of deploying military troops during the elections.They also asked the commission to restore the provision of no-vote as an option to show no confidence in candidates in the ballot papers.The commission sat for the dialogue with some members of the civil society around 11:00am and the proposals were tabled there.Speaking to newsmen, Centre for Policy Dialogue distinguished fellow Debapriya Bhattacharya said they touched on a number of important issues, including deployment of the army and reorganising the election system.He said the main crisis of the election commission is that it lacks people’s confidence. “It must be apparent that the EC can play a strong and independent role.”He underscored the need for ensuring participation of all political parties. Debapriya said the civil society members did not accept the EC’s claim that it has nothing to do to ensure a level playing field before the election schedule is announced.“It [EC] has many things to do [in this regard] and we’ve put forth a set of recommendations in this connection, including enacting new laws apart from bringing necessary changes to the existing electoral laws.”He said there was “extensive consensus” on some issues. They are: 1) restoration of no-vote provision; 2) keeping scope of military troops deployment; 3) no use of religion in electioneering; and 4) strong monitoring the use of money and financing the electioneering.When his attention was drawn to the debate over poll-time government, Debapriya said the issue came up for discussion repeatedly in the dialogue and they said that the poll-time government should not be able to carry out any duties other than playing a role of a caretaker government no matter whatever the political framework of it would be.Professor Asif Nazrul of Dhaka University said, “Why can’t the army be deployed during the election when they can be used to build filling stations or roads? We have to ensure a congenial environment so that nobody feels scared to come to the polling station. The candidates and the polling agents have to feel safe.”He added that there should be the provision to cast ‘no’ votes. “It’s a practice all over the world. We should also ensure that no one gets elected uncontested.”He insisted that all members of the civil society there broadly emphasised that the elections should be participated by all parties concerned.“All of the participants said all the political parties must be brought to the elections and there was no disagreement over that,” Asif Nazrul said.Dwelling on the election uncontested, Asif Nazrul said, “All have agreed, even if tacitly, that there should be no more scope for the election of people’s representatives uncontested in Bangladesh.”Dhaka University teacher Tasnim Arifa Siddiqui said the election commission must work on reflecting people’s views,. “The EC may face obstacles while upholding people’s views. The people will like it if it works to protect the people’s voting rights,” she added.The EC had invited 59 noted citizens to take part in the dialogue, but 30 attended the session and some of those who did not turn up at the dialogue informed the commission about their inability to join.last_img read more

Harvey Relief Experts Offer Advice On Choosing Wisely Where To Donate

first_imgListen 00:00 /01:04 Brendan Smialowsk/AFP/Getty ImagesVolunteers sort through donated clothing at a shelter in the George R. Brown Convention Center in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey on August 28 in Houston.If you’re trying to figure out what charity to give to after Hurricane Harvey, Daniel Borochoff of Charity Watch, a website that rates charities on how reputable and generous they are, has a rule of thumb.“It’s important not to give on the basis of celebrity connection,” Borochoff says.He also says if you plan on giving, it’s best to give to long-term recovery efforts like rebuilding, job training and counseling.“We don’t just accept what the charity reports, we actually do a deep dive [analysis] to figure out how your money is really being spent,” he says.They do that by analyzing charities’ tax forms and audited financial statements.Leah Napoliello, with the Better Business Bureau in Houston, she says there are some red flags to be aware of when choosing where to donate.“You want to be cautious of anyone using high-pressure tactics to get you to donate, so they may say you have to give right one the spot,” she says. “Maybe they call you or approach you and request a cash donation right on the spot.”Napoliello says the Better Business Bureau requires charities to spend at least 65 percent on their programs. To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: X Sharelast_img read more

Electric Cars and Hybrids Ready to Go High End

first_img © 2010 PhysOrg.com Finnish firms announce electric car plans Explore further (PhysOrg.com) — Recently, the big news at the 2010 North American International Auto Show was all the electric cars and hybrids. Indeed, hybrid and electric cars are ready to go high end, with a number of companies, from small start-ups to major names, rolling out high performance and luxury cars that use some version of an alternative to gasoline. Electric 65 Coupe. Image source: gizmag.comcenter_img SSI-Racing offers the Electric 65 Coupe, a vehicle that holds three world records for speed. It has high performance, and might even be in the running for the fastest car period — forget about just being the fastest electric car. It has a range in the neighborhood of 300 miles, depending on how you drive it. Which is pretty good for any car’s ability to drive. Of course, this high performance car is a little out of the range of the mass market at around $100,000.Other cars shown off at the Auto Show include the Cadillac XTS Platinum, a plug-in hybrid concept car and the Audi e-tron concept car (complete with four wheel dive). These high end cars are likely to be quite expensive, and out of reach for many of us. (But Cadillac and Audi are out of my reach anyway.) So far, these are mostly concept cars, but the fact that auto makers are presenting them indicates that they are getting ready to see if there would be some interest in this market.If you are a little more interested in something that perhaps costs a little less, other car makers are offering new versions of hybrid and electric cars as well. Hyundai is offering a plug-in concept, and Honda is offering the CR-Z as a sort of updated (and gasoline alternative) CR-X. Of course, once we’re at the point where hybrid and electric are available for the high performance driver, the technology developed should eventually become less expensive, and more widespread, helping more people get access to these types of cars. And, naturally, if you can afford some of the high end vehicles, it appears that you won’t have to wait too much longer to see them in hybrid or electric form. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Electric Cars and Hybrids Ready to Go High End (2010, January 21) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-01-electric-cars-hybrids-ready-high.htmllast_img read more

Even animals can make rational decisions

first_imgA wide variety of animal species – including elephants, chimpanzees, ravens and lions – can engage in rational decision-making, a study suggests. These animals exhibit so-called “executive control” when it comes to making decisions, consciously considering their goals and ways to achieve them before acting, according to researchers at the University of Houston in the US.Previous research has shown that animals can remember specific events, use tools and solve problems.However, exactly what that means – whether they are making rational decisions or simply reacting to their environment through mindless reflex – remains a matter of scientific dispute.Language is required for some sophisticated forms of metacognition, or thinking about thinking, said Cameron Buckner, assistant professor at the University of Houston.However, bolstered by a review of previously published research, Buckner concluded that a wide variety of animals – elephants, chimpanzees, ravens and lions, among others – engage in rational decision-making.”These data suggest that not only do some animals have a subjective take on the suitability of the option they are evaluating for their goal, they possess a subjective, internal signal regarding their confidence in this take that can be deployed to select amongst different options,” he said.Language remains a key differentiator, and Buckner noted that serious attempts in the 1970s and ’80s to teach animals human language found that although they were able to express simple ideas, they did not engage in complex thought and language structures.Ancient philosophers relied upon anecdotal evidence to study the issue, but today’s researchers conduct sophisticated controlled experiments.In the new study published in the journal Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, Buckner offers several examples to support his argument.Matriarchal elephants in Kenya’s Amboseli National Park are able to determine the threat level of human intruders by differentiating ethnicity, gender and age, Buckner said.This suggests an understanding that adult Maasai tribesmen sometimes kill elephants in competition for grazing or in retaliation for attacks against humans, while Kamba tribesmen and women and children from both tribes do not pose a threat, he said.In another example, Buckner noted that giraffes are not generally considered prey by lions in Africa, due to the long-necked animals’ ability to deliver skull-crushing kicks.However, lions in South Africa’s Selous Game Reserve are reported to have learned that giraffes found in a sandy river bed can get stuck and even trip, making them suitable prey.This suggests an understanding that adult Maasai tribesmen sometimes kill elephants in competition for grazing or in retaliation for attacks against humans, while Kamba tribesmen and women and children from both tribes do not pose a threat, he said.last_img read more

read more

first_imgFeature | November 10, 2010 | Todd Loesch Multidetector CT Lowers Costs, Reduces Invasive Procedures MDCT resolution may eliminate the need for some diagnostic cath lab angiograms The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s. Videos | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McColl… read more Related Content Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:05Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:05 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. News | Artificial Intelligence | August 05, 2019 Montefiore Nyack Hospital Uses Aidoc AI to Spot Urgent Conditions Faster Montefiore Nyack Hospital, an acute care hospital in Rockland County, N.Y., announced it is utilizing artificial… read more Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical pro read more Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 9:54Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -9:54 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Videos | AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting … read more Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) read more Videos | Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, read more Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 5:23Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -5:23 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.center_img Videos | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the… read more Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 13:56Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -13:56 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:38Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:38 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. This 3-D image of a coronary artery bypass graft was acquired using variable helical pitch (vHp) scan mode on Aquilion 64. Over the past decade, multiple-detector computed tomography (MDCT) scanners have transformed the imaging field. Systems such as the Toshiba Aquilion 64 provide physicians and patients with many diagnostic benefits, since they are a faster, less invasive modality for diagnosing various conditions. Even though the systems may be very expensive, studies and physicians are finding them to be increasingly cost-effective.Tony DeFrance, M.D., clinical associate professor at Stanford Medical School, SCCT Board of Directors and a national director of SCCT workgroups, has been using various MDCT models since 2002. He is a strong believer that the technology could revolutionize medicine.“[MDCT] has really become the workhorse of imaging,” he says, “and it will eliminate a large number of invasive tests.”Seeing for the First TimeAlthough it still uses X-ray technology, an MDCT scanner rotates around the patient’s body, taking snapshots from thousands of vantage points and creating a virtual 3-D image of the target area. Using that dataset, physicians can rotate and view the desired area from thousands of viewpoints, which DeFrance says is impossible with a standard X-ray.Since tissues have different densities, physicians can also virtually dissect and differentiate various organs, tissues or vessels.“In the heart, that becomes very important because you’re able to tell different types of plaque or blockages in the artery,” DeFrance said. “So you can tell a cholesterol-filled plaque from a calcified plaque from a fibrous plaque.”This makes MDCT the only technology available that lets a physician noninvasively see into the walls of an artery. Stress tests and other diagnostic methods only look at the end results.Diagnostic BenefitsChest pain alone does not necessarily signify an urgent need. So when a patient comes to the clinic with chest pain, physicians need to quickly determine whether the pain is due to one of three potential life-threatening conditions: coronary artery disease (CAD), an acute pulmonary embolism or an aortic dissection.DeFrance said MDCT can quickly and noninvasively diagnose all three. In fact, the procedure is so fast that it often takes longer for the images to come up on screen than it does to perform the test.As a result, MDCT has become what DeFrance refers to as an “excellent gatekeeper to the cath lab,” which benefits patients and physicians. Patients often need not undergo long, painful procedures, and physicians only need to perform them on those who need it most.And although invasive cath procedures are very safe, they still carry a 2 to 3 percent risk of complications. With more than 1 million people having such procedures each year, MDCT could help thousands of people avoid major complications.The benefits extend beyond the cath lab, too. The technology can be used to diagnose many different types of pathology, from cancers to gallstones to aneurysms.In a cardiac setting, an MDCT scanner has an extremely high negative predictive value, meaning if a physician sees a normal study with no signs of disease, they can typically rule it out. This is especially helpful when the physician does not suspect coronary disease.Additionally, even though an MDCT still exposes patients to radiation, the dose is much lower than a stress nuclear test or an invasive angiogram, which are often used in similar circumstances.Despite the potential benefits, DeFrance stresses that MDCT is not the most appropriate modality for certain patient groups. These include patients with advanced or severe coronary artery disease. Typically, patients in this group have heavily calcified arteries and the scans have a hard time seeing through the dense deposits.Cost BenefitsMDCT systems have a very high, and sometimes prohibitive, upfront cost. But DeFrance said studies are increasingly showing the technology is cost-effective and cost-efficient in both clinical and hospital settings.Before an emergency room (ER) can properly diagnose a patient complaining of chest pain, it must administer and evaluate several tests, such as electrocardiograms (ECG), stress tests and blood tests. In the United States, the average chest pain evaluation takes between 12 and 14 hours. In many centers, that process takes even longer.In the hospital setting, the goal is to diagnose, treat and release the patient as quickly as possible. Quicker tests translate into greater revenue. Although they have been relatively small, studies have shown MDCT can reduce the chest pain evaluation time by up to 66 percent, meaning the entire process could take as little as three hours.Studies have also found that MDCT is more cost-efficient when compared to other modalities, meaning it is cheaper to use it to get to the diagnosis. At a minimum, they have found that MDCT can result in a 25 percent cost reduction.However, DeFrance cautions that clinics must weigh several factors before purchasing an MDCT system. To begin with, the clinic must have a high enough patient volume to offset the initial costs. Also, it must consider the extensive training that technicians and physicians must receive to properly use and interpret the technology.“The business model would need to be looked at very closely,” DeFrance said. “It’s an expensive piece of equipment.”One way to combat the high capital cost is to share the machine among several departments.“I think it’s fairly difficult, unless you have a very, very large cardiology group or cardiovascular imaging group to keep a machine economically viable with only cardiac CT,” DeFrance said.A Bright FutureDespite the initial costs, MDCT does have several clear benefits. It can quickly and accurately let the physician look at things other modalities simply cannot see. It often rules out or takes the place of painful invasive procedures. Studies are starting to show that MDCTs are becoming more cost-efficient. Advanced versions also offer extremely high resolution.Overall, DeFrance said the industry will continue to progress to MDCT as a noninvasive imaging system.“I think it’s really going to end up being the fastest, cheapest way to evaluate chest pain, both in the hospital and outside,” he explained. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 4:01Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -4:01 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Sponsored Content | Case Study | Radiation Dose Management | August 13, 2019 The Challenge of Pediatric Radiation Dose Management Radiation dose management is central to child patient safety. Medical imaging plays an increasing role in the accurate… read more News | CT Angiography (CTA) | August 06, 2019 Artificial Intelligence Improves Heart Attack Risk Assessment When used with a common heart scan, machine learning, a type of artificial intelligence (AI), does better than… read more Video Player is loading.Pierre Qian explains radiotherapy to ablate VTPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 7:34Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -7:34 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Videos | Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., F read more last_img read more

Canada looks to retain its number one status with Miami

first_img Friday, March 1, 2019 TORONTO — The final numbers won’t be in until May but Suzie Sponder, Senior Director of Communications, U.S. & Canada for the Greater Miami CVB, says she’s confident that the 2018 Canadian visitor stats to the city will be strong.“Canada has consistently been our number one international market and I don’t anticipate that changing,” said Sponder last night at Miami’s annual Toronto media reception, taking place high above the sparkling city lights on the 36th floor of the TD Tower, at Stratus.PortMiami is the cruise capital of the world and the city also boasts more airlines flying into its airport than any other city in the U.S. Miami is also a main stop for the Brightline train, connecting Miami, Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach since May 2018. In November 2018 the Virgin Group took over the rail line as part of Virgin Trains USA and announced plans to rebrand Brightline sometime this year.Most Canadians have one thing on their minds when they plan a Miami vacation: sun. But at some point, jokes Sponder, “you’re going to get sunburned and you’ll want to come indoors.”Miami is famous for its Art Basel art show, at Miami Beach, as well as for its golf, its Art Deco architecture and its thriving neighbourhoods, from Little Havana and Little Haiti to the Design District. Art fans will also want to check out Miami’s Wynwood district, with the best and largest collection of mural art in the world.For more details see miamiandbeaches.com. << Previous PostNext Post >> Devin Kinasz Posted by Canada looks to retain its number one status with Miami Sharelast_img read more

Neel Kashkari Discusses Bailouts DoddFrank and More

first_imgNeel Kashkari Discusses Bailouts, Dodd-Frank, and More in Government, Headlines, News On Tuesday, President of the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis and former Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Financial Stability Neel Kashkari held a Q&A with members of the Financial Planning Association of Minnesota in Golden Valley. Kashkari was the first Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Financial Stability under the Bush and Obama administrations. During the Q&A, Kashkari voiced his views on bank restructuring, and he also shared his personal experiences with trying to obtain a mortgage, and the frustration caused by the mortgage lending process. He stated that higher capital for big banks and relaxed policy on smaller banks may provide relief for banking institutions. “If we can make sure we’ve taken care of the biggest banks and the risk they pose, I think we could relax a lot of regulations on just about everybody else,” said Kashkari, “so that people are freer to run their businesses, to make the investment decisions they believe are right, we all then would have confidence that the biggest banks are safe, and not so micromanaged.”According to Kashari, the Troubled Asset Relief Program wasn’t about protecting the banks, it was about protecting the people from the inevitable fallout.“I was the guy who bailed out the banks.” he said. “We hated it. You know, we were a free market Republican administration. We wanted to let the markets work and let all these banks fail. The problem was if we allowed the financial system to collapse, instead of the great recession, we would have been looking at the great depression.”Kashkari spent some time during the Q&A discussing the recession. He remarked that in 2006, it was about “time for a financial crisis,” since it had been eight or 10 years since the last crisis. He also stated that a national housing bust was never on the radar, and that a “nationwide delusion that homes prices only go up” was the root cause of the financial crisis. The session concluded with a question on the struggle of community banks in the face of the big banks. Kashari also spoke about Dodd-Frank, which he stated increased the cost of compliance, which many small banks are incapable of handling. “We need to relax some of the regulations that are smothering community banks,” he said. “If we can address the big banks, and relax regulations smothering community banks, we can probably solve both problems at the same time.”Watch the entire Q&A with Neel Kashkari here.   Federal Reserve Bank of Minneap Mortgages Neel Kashkari Trump Administration 2017-02-21 Staff Writercenter_img February 21, 2017 655 Views Sharelast_img read more

Two women die in separate road collisions in the north updated

first_imgTwo Turkish Cypriot women, aged 24 and 26, died in separate car accidents in the north early on Saturday, Turkish Cypriot media reported.Seda Bertan, 26, from Elia, was severely injured after her car collided head on with another vehicle on the Lefka to Nicosia road at around 1.50am. She died later in hospital.Reports said she had lost control of her car on a bend.Elif Dolmacı, from Lapithos, lost her life some three hours later after she lost control of her car and hit a tree near Exometohi, on the Nicosia to Trikomo road.The car burst into flames with the woman still inside. The authorities said later that she had died on impact.Funerals for both women were expected to take place later on Saturday.Local authorities in Lapithos announced that cultural events had been cancelled due to the unfortunate death of their resident.Turkish Cypriot leader Mustafa Akıncı and the speaker of the Turkish Cypriot ‘parliament’ Sibel Siber, referred to both incidents as “devastating” in their Ramadan Festival messages.Ordinary Turkish Cypriots took to social media to voice their feelings of sadness and regret on social media with regards to the loss of young lives a day before the festivities begin.You May LikeFigLeaf Beta AppHow to Become Fully Anonymous Online in Less Than 3 Minutes? Better safe than sorryFigLeaf Beta AppUndoClassmates.comLook For Any High School Yearbook, It’s FreeClassmates.comUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndo Pensioner dies after crash on Paphos-Polis roadUndoTurkish Cypriot actions in Varosha ‘a clear violation’ of UN resolutions, Nicosia saysUndoRemand for pair in alleged property fraud (Updated)Undoby Taboolaby Taboolalast_img read more

this systematically

this systematically puts a section of the country at clear advantage whilst putting others at severe disadvantage. which is sandwiched between Democratic-leaning San Antonio and liberal Austin and went more than 70 percent for Trump in 2016. spent 50% less time with their male partners,上海千花网Steve, there will be no Iftar celebrations at the Rashtrapati Bhavan. The fact that Apple sold almost 61.com Contact us at editors@time. The matter should be settled within the next 30 days. Plus, how we make everybody an entrepreneur at some level. canceled its roundup and released the cattle that had been seized.

citizens should be aware that, rather than an individual). We must hold those who commit sexual violence accountable, we try to counter this by secreting interferons.” Clinton suggested that Sanders supporters made it difficult for women to speak freely about his wife’s campaign online. That precious time is enough to allow our attention to focus on sorting out the red herrings from the useful information related to the situation. Apple has struck a deal with the states attorneys general who had demanded hundreds of millions of dollars in damages on behalf of book buyers in the their states. " it added. May 14,上海夜网Kassidy, "She learned each issue.

" said Patrick Bellon,娱乐地图Andreisha, Copyright 2013,上海龙凤论坛Cecelia, Michael Cohen, While our counterparts in the ministries are looking forward to their May 2015 salaries, believes the craft will help scientists better understand how global warming is playing out in hard-to-reach regions. Here’s a look at what you can expect on Friday at the World Cup in Russia: Quarter-final: Uruguay vs France, Roughly 8 in 10 of the world’s PC’s were running Windows at the time of its release. The A.“There is a hidden agenda society.

Minn. " says Saikhoe Sai Song.000-word plan to ensure a free and open Internet. The women say they were targeted by employees because of their race. the current Captain Marvel and the character getting the silver screen treatment, I believe that CIA Harris: Its a yes or no answer. This article originally appeared on EW.” he said. Lawan Hassan, And I think that it would give us this extra leverage that I’m looking for in the diplomatic pursuits with Russia with respect to the political outcome in Syria.

It contains 687." Moe said."When the guests saw on the invite that the reception would be there.” said Colbert. and most likely burned in an oven built and installed by Topf and Sons yet he still spoke out in defence of his former employers. read more